parietal pleura


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pa·ri·e·tal pleur·a

[TA]
the serous membrane that lines the different parts of the wall of the pulmonary cavity; called costal, diaphragmatic, and mediastinal, according to the parts invested.
Synonym(s): pleura parietalis [TA]

parietal pleura

the outer layer of the pleura, lining the walls of the thoracic cavity.

pa·ri·e·tal pleu·ra

(pă-rī'ĕ-tăl plūr'ă) [TA]
The serous membrane that lines the different parts of the wall of the pulmonary cavity; called costal, diaphragmatic, and mediastinal, according to the parts invested.

parietal pleura

The serous membrane that lines the chest cavity; it extends from the mediastinal roots of the lungs and covers the sides of the pericardium to the chest wall and backward to the spine. The visceral and parietal pleural layers are separated only by a lubricating secretion. These layers may become adherent or separated by air or by blood, pus, or other fluids, when the lungs or chest wall are injured or inflamed.
Synonym: costal pleura
See also: pleura
References in periodicals archive ?
Extrapleural pneumonectomy is indicated in some cases of malignant mesothelioma and tuberculous empyema and involves resection of lung and parietal pleura with prosthetic reconstruction.
He then underwent a standard pleural pneumonectomy, involving removal of the right lung, associated parietal pleura, right aspect of the pericardium and phrenic nerve and the diaphragm.
Use of the lower frequency 3-5 MHz probe offers a wider depth of field and a more global view of the lung and the effusion (10,11) The separation between visceral and parietal pleura is measured in millimetres (mm) in the supine position in mid-axillary line at the end of expiration which shows maximal separation.
The appearance of asbestos fibers in the parietal pleura resulting in the formation of subpleural plaques is inexplicable.
Mechanical abrasion of the parietal pleura was carried out using dry gauze or sterilized electrocautery tip cleaner mounted on a grasper (Fig.
The parietal pleura are attached to chest wall, mediastinum and diaphragm, and are--in contrast to the visceral layer--highly sensitive to pain (Dowdeswell 1998, Sahn 1988, Light 2001, English & Leslie 2006).
The parietal pleura was fragile and hyperaemic, with pedunculated protuberances which bled easily.
They usually arise from the visceral or parietal pleura and peritoneum, although they have been found in many areas throughout the body.
The parietal pleura (outer pleural layer) lines the chest wall and covers the diaphragm.
Air was noted around the vocal cords and great vessels of the neck, within the mediastinum surrounding the esophagus and aorta, and in between the parietal pleura and the chest wall.
They cited the work of Scadding and Wood,[6] who described a similar mechanism between the visceral and parietal pleura as the source of systolic clicks in a left pneumothorax.