pareto improvement

pareto improvement

any change in economic management that improves the situation of one or more members of the community without worsening the lot of anyone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second-best theory can be advanced to explain why particular efforts to set price equal to marginal cost might not be a Pareto improvement in the presence of numerous instances where that equality condition is violated.
A Pareto improvement occurs if at least one person is made
There is no need to single out certain targets in this overall process, under the definitions of Pareto improvement and Pareto optimality discussed above.
The hawks aACAo the Israelis, the Saudis, and their congressional allies aACAo however, oppose this pareto improvement for the two negotiating parties, because it's not a pareto improvement for them," he said.
Maximizing GDP is not a Pareto improvement if the policies pursued to maximize it are not free from the use of force or coercion.
Thus, M' cannot be a Pareto improvement on M if x chooses a' and y chooses b' in M', since a = a' and b = b' imply no one is strictly better off.
In the next century Pareto, the Italian philosopher provides a theoretical mechanism to evaluate different states with an otherwise simple looking criterion that any change that makes at least one person better off without making any one else worse off is a Pareto improvement and a situation where no Pareto improvement is possible is Pareto optimal.
If Sol gets $900 while Lydia gets $9 or even nothing, that's a Pareto improvement, but if Sol is taxed $900 to transfer a benefit to Lydia, that is not a Pareto improvement, because we cannot say anything about how Sol and Lydia value $900.
As the author admits, though, by concentrating on the potential for Pareto improvement between indigenous security forces and domestic insurgents, his analysis vastly oversimplifies the internal dynamics of the Iraqi domestic situation.
After introducing his CBA model drawn from the revealed preference approach to estimation involving weighted benefits and costs and such underlying theoretical concepts as Pareto improvement, compensation tests and the distribution of income in this framework, he presents real-life applications of CBA in areas including criminal justice (e.
Because we can't compare or, a fortiori, add utilities, we can define society's welfare (also called "society's real income") only when there is unanimity: social welfare increases when at least one individual is better off and no one is worse off, a condition known as Pareto improvement, in recognition of Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923), who invented this approach.
Posner's thought is that because no one is made worse off under a Pareto improvement and at least one person is made better off, it follows that no one would object to--or, more strongly, that everyone would consent to--Pareto improvements.