parentification

parentification

 [pah-ren″tĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the assumption of a parentlike (or adult) role by a child.
References in periodicals archive ?
She also mentions the frequent occurrence of children's parentification, due to the assumption of parental and protective roles for younger brothers and sisters, as well as assuming parental roles for protecting their mother.
In fact, her passivity results in the parentification of Simon and Augie when the two brothers are growing up.
According to Oldfield, Princess Diana also showed many traits of NPD, manipulation, playing the victim, smear campaigning, making her children look after her despite their young age, which is called parentification.
(2018) investigate the extent to which parentification and language brokering are similarly related to mental health outcomes in theoretically expected ways.
Assumption of adult roles by the military child, sometimes referred to as parentification (Bowling & Sherman, 2008; Hooper, Marotta, & Lanthier, 2008), may occur during deployment times.
They can take the form of family subsystem boundaries that shield children from parental relationship issues and prevent the triangulation and parentification of children.
Children whose parents are not divorced are more likely to experience parentification than the ones whose parents are divorced.
Researchers have shown that romantic attachment could mediate the effect of parental bonds on body dissatisfaction (Patton, Beaujean, & Benedict, 2014) as well as the effects of parentification and dating communication (Madden & Shaffer, 2016).
In addition to the physical and emotional suffering, one of the main consequences related to children's triangulations after marital separation refers to the parentification process.
"The 'Parentification' Phenomenon as Applied to Adolescents Living through Parental Military Deployments." Canadian Journal of Family and Youth 4.1 (2012): 1-27.
parentification is largely absent from this State's case law, and