parent

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par·ent

(par'ĕnt),
1. An individual that has produced at least one offspring through sexual reproduction.
2. Any source or basis, as for the elaboration of a substance.
[L. parens, fr. pario, to bring forth]

parent

(pâr′ənt, păr′-)
n.
1.
a. A female person whose egg unites with a sperm or a male person whose sperm unites with an egg, resulting in the conception of a child or the birth of a child.
b. A female person who is pregnant with or gives birth to a child except when someone else has legal rights to the child.
c. A person who adopts a child.
d. A person who raises a child.
2. An ancestor; a progenitor.
3. An organism that produces or generates offspring.
v. par·ented, par·enting, par·ents

par′ent·hood′ n.

parent

Etymology: L, parens
a mother or father; one who bears offspring. parental, adj.

parent

Vox populi A person who has produced one or more offspring from a sexual union. See Adoptive parent, Fertile adoptive parent, Foster parent, Genetic parent, Grandparent, Psychological parent, Real parent, Step-parent, Surrogate parent, Unwed parent.

Patient discussion about parent

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parent
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the debate over marital choice remained tied to the notion of "filial duty," those words implied more than a parentally approved marriage.
1993), parentally bereaved children were referred for help elsewhere as appropriate.
H2: A strong feeling of personal satisfaction will be a less influential motivator for federally funded accounting students than for private company and parentally funded accounting students.
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, May 2004: Abandoned by his parents as an infant, Cosmo Hill grows up in the Clarissa Frayne Institute for Parentally Challenged Boys, a ghastly orphanage that puts the boys to work testing dangerous products.
Franklin had been the more socially prominent, successful, and parentally endorsed suitor (Wolff and Minter 159).
In Australia, however, education systems have rarely provided comprehensive food services, preferring to supplement parentally provided foods (in the form of the 'lunch box').
Phillips reminds us that most female, medieval "virginities" were intended to be "lost'--preferably on a parentally sanctioned wedding night.
With Achim and Sandra delighted by their parentally unsupervised freedom to experiment sexually, Tobi can't suppress jealousy.
Colfer has moved away from his arch criminal to produce another rip-roaring book about 14-year-old Cosmo Hill who is incarcerated in the Clarissa Frayne Institute for Parentally Challenged Boys.