parental rejection


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pa·ren·tal re·jec·tion

1. withholding of affection from or denial of attention to one's child;
2. child's withholding of affection from its parent.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parental rejection

The refusal of a parent to accept or show affection for a son or daughter.
See also: rejection
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: The perceived parental rejection increase emotional disorders e.g., ADHD, oppositional deficient disorder and conduct disorder in children.
The present research was designed: (1) to examine differences in perceived parental attitude and dependency in children's personality disposition and (2) to see the relationship between perceived parental rejection and dependency in children's personality disposition.
Their findings suggest that the students in our study likely experienced much less parental rejection when compared to an average American sample recruited from the community.
The investigation of the correlations between the different dimensions of parenting practices and behavior problems indicated that high levels of parental rejection and low behavioral control correlated with aggression and delinquency.
Feldman and Downey (1994) conducted a study to investigate the relationship that early childhood parental rejection had on rejection sensitivity and then examined whether rejection sensitivity mediated the relationship between parental rejection (e.g., parental violence) and interpersonal difficulty later in life (i.e., insecure attachment style).
Research has also demonstrated an association of parental rejection with decreased mental health and self-destructive behaviours.
The few studies that found slight statistical support for antisemitic ideas among Jews found themes of authoritarianism, parental rejection (Sarnoff 1951), and "distrust of others and a less than adequate sense of security" (Demarkovsky 1978, 58).
H3: Perceived undifferentiated parental rejection will be lower among emotionally empathic adolescents as compared to non- empathic adolescents.
That is one of many findings in a new large-scale analysis of research about the power of parental rejection and acceptance in shaping our personalities as children and into adulthood.
Vulnerability to depression as a function of parental rejection and control.
The concept of chronic sorrow offers afresh perspective for understanding the negative emotional impact of parental rejection on children.