parent figure


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parent figure

Etymology: L, parens + figura, form
1 a parent or a substitute parent or guardian who cares for a child, providing the physical, social, and emotional requirements necessary for normal growth and development.
2 a person who symbolically represents an ideal parent, having those attributes that one conceptualizes as necessary for forming the perfect parent-child relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
To constrain potential confounds introduced by variation in family structure, participants were limited to youth from two-parent, intact families rather than different parent figures (e.
The index of parental monitoring was based on an adolescent's perception of parent or parent figure knowledge on three different questions: where the adolescent goes at night, what the adolescent does with his or her free time, and who the adolescent's friends are.
8) Questions are asked regarding five dimensions of parental behavior--how often each parent or parent figure expressed love and affection, insulted or criticized, screamed and yelled, was willing to be fair and compromise, encouraged what was important to the other, and blamed the other for problems.
If the parent figure professed certain beliefs but engaged in behaviors that were blatantly contrary, this might have resulted in God's integrity being questioned.
However, as an exemplary parent figure, Sandler by balancing warmth and affection with directness "minus [.
These clay figures depict a grandparent or parent figure with lots of little ones clamoring about to hear the elder's words.
Many bar owners say they feel like something of a parent figure to some of their employees and even some customers.
from an overprotective or domineering parent figure.
A homesick camper may sometimes need an enthusiastic, goofy counselor to cheer her up, but at other times that same child may need a quiet listener, a sympathizing friend, or a stern parent figure.
Lacking consistent interaction with a responsible parent figure, an increasing number of these kids grow up angry and careless of others.
Patients often invest high hopes in new medical technologies or expect physicians to fill the role of a parent figure.
While we ought to encourage each client to be the best parent he or she can be, Leving and Kenik do a disservice in advising the creation of a courtroom-worthy parent figure for the purpose of litigation.

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