paraxial


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to paraxial: paraxial rays

par·ax·i·al

(par-ak'sē-ăl),
By the side of the axis of any body or part.

paraxial

[perak′sē·əl]
pertaining to an organ or other structure located near the axis of the body.

par·ax·i·al

(par-ak'sē-ăl)
By the side of the axis of any body or part.

paraxial 

Pertains to light rays situated near enough to the axis of an optical system for the gaussian theory to apply. See gaussian theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned earlier, Fresnel did not know the form of these factors and simply omitted them, assuming correctly that they are not needed in a paraxial theory.
Vortex Flow of Light: Spin" and Orbital" Flows in a Circularly Polarized Paraxial Beam (Aleksandr Bekshaev and Mikhail Vasnetsov).
He assumes readers are familiar with ray-tracing procedures, paraxial data, and third-order aberrations and have access to a computer lens design and analysis program.
Physicist Kloos introduces the method of Gaussian transfer matrices in paraxial optics and compares the approach to other paraxial methods.
Koch 1842), found mating with females in the field, yet presenting only one hemispermatophore, the right paraxial organ (that produces the hemispermatophore) being absent in both specimens (Peretti 2000).
We can estimate the effect of this divergence if we consider the standing-wave-induced focusing of atoms in a purely paraxial model.
The self-contained material allows the selection of specific themes grouped in the following way: Paraxial ray optics with matrix methods and aberrations.
The reader is expected to be familiar with ray-tracing procedures, paraxial data, and third-order aberrations and to have access to a computer lens design and analysis program.
Considering the oral inclination of the cuspules, their ornamentation and their unique presence in mygalomorphs with paraxial chelicerae, a mechanical function seems probable.
In the paraxial Fresnel approximation where z is positive and large compared to [lambda] and x/z is small all of the above-mentioned solutions converge to the familiar Fresnel limit [u.
In 16 self-contained chapters that include color illustrations and lists of relevant literature, Gross (optical design, Carl Zeiss Institute) explains the basics of paraxial imaging of lenses and systems, interfaces, including Fresnel equations, materials, including glass, quartz and plastic and their applications, ray-tracing, including formula sets, radiometry, light sources, including Planck's formula, sensor technology, signal processing, optical systems, aberrations, wave optics, plano-optical components, gratings, special components, and optical measurement and testing techniques.
This phase extraction is possible by the application of the so-called paraxial "Transport of Intensity Equation" (TIE) to the image intensity profiles, which allowed the researchers to employ a simple, robust experimental setup without the need for stringent environmental control required in a typical interferometry experiment.