parasitoid


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par·a·si·toid

(par'ă-sī'toyd),
Denoting a feeding relationship intermediate between predation and parasitism, in which the parasitoid eventually destroys its host; refers especially to parasitic wasps (order Hymenoptera) the larvae of which feed on and finally destroy a grub or other arthropod host stung by the mother wasp before laying its egg(s) on the host.
[parasite + G. eidos, appearance]

parasitoid

(păr′ə-sĭ-toid′, -sī′toid)
n.
An organism, usually an insect, that lives on or in a host organism during some period of its development and eventually kills its host.

par′a·sit·oid′ adj.

parasitoid

any of the alternately parasitic and free-living wasps and flies, such as the ichneumon fly, whose larvae parasitize and often kill members of the host species.
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For each month, we tested whether the increase in parasitoid population was correlated to herbivore population increase, then we built GLM models according to its adequate error distribution.
Additionally, the increase in the herbivore abundance was not correlated to an increase in parasitoid abundance in any of the sampled months (p>0.05).
radiata from Pakistan and other parts of Asia do not differ in such an obvious manner, less obvious differences may exist, as has been observed between populations of other parasitoid species (e.g., Encarsia formosa Gehan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) (Henter & van Lenteren 1996).
The current study indicated that hibiscus is, among those tested in this study, the best plant species to mass rear the mealybug and its associated parasitoid in a context of biological control program.
Later, each gall was dissected to examine its contents, tallying the following: (1) cells with the ACGW ((i) larvae, (ii) white pupae, (iii) black pupae, and (iv) adults); (2) cells with parasitoids ((i) larvae, (ii) pupae, and (iii) adults); (3) cells with parasitoid exuviae (most parasitoid species leave the pupal exuviae inside the cell after emergence); (4) empty cells from which the ACGW had already emerged (all cells linked with an emergence hole and without pupal exuviae fell in this category, even though this overestimated slightly the number of emerged ACGW since a small percentage of parasitoids does not leave pupal exuviae in the cell, similarly to the ACGW); (5) empty cells without emergence holes.
Therefore, it is fundamental to know the relationship suitable between number of parasitoids to be released in relation to the density of host eggs presented in the agroecosystem, and the host-egg age more favorable to parasitism, in order to determine the release intervals of the parasitoid in the field (Ko et al., 2014; Polanczyk, Pratissoli, Holtz, Pereira, & Furtado, 2007).
In each jar (replication) twenty un- parasitized pupae were seeded on soil surface inside the jars and then different depths of plant debris were covered and three pairs of pupal parasitoid D.
The cumulative curve of emergences of this embryonic parasitoid on a number of 56 eggs mass is represented by the figure 3.
Why is Coccidoxenoides perminutus, a mealybug parasitoid, ineffective as a biocontrol agent-Inaccurate measures of parasitism or low adult survival?.
"This decline was due to significant increases in EAB larval parasitism, first by native parasitoids, then by T.