paraphasia


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Related to paraphasia: echolalia, paraphrasing

paraphasia

 [par″ah-fa´zhah]
partial aphasia in which the patient uses wrong words, or uses words in wrong and senseless combinations. Called also paragrammatism, paraphemia, and paraphrasia.

par·a·pha·si·a

(par'ă-fā'zē-ă),
A form of aphasia in which a person has lost the ability to speak correctly, substituting one word for another and jumbling words and sentences unintelligibly.
See also: jargon.
[para- + G. phasis, speech]

paraphasia

The habitual substitution of inappropriate or meaningless words or jargonisms.

Paraphasias
• Literal paraphasia—Substitution of an inappropriate phoneme (syllable). 
• Verbal paraphasia—Substituion of a complete word; fluent paraphasic speech is termed jargon aphasia.
• Delirium (incoherency).

par·a·pha·si·a

(par'ă-fā'zē-ă)
A symptom of aphasia in which speech is fluent but incorrect due to word and sound substitutions.
See also: paragrammatism, receptive aphasia
[para- + G. phasis, speech]

paraphasia

A DYSPHASIA in which speech is fluent but often meaningless or irrelevant and contains incorrectly substituted words. This is a feature of Wernicke's dysphasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
An aphasia syndrome including reduction of speech output, anomia, and paraphasias but without repeating difficulty is attributed to the thalamus.
When trying to repeat a sentence, they will produce many paraphasias; they tend to make more errors trying to repeat words than trying to repeat numbers.
However, significant alterations were detected in prosody, repetition, oral praxis, fluency, and content information; phonemic fluency was diminished; reading aloud and writing to dictation of non-words were impaired; syntactic processing was slightly altered; and phonemic paraphasias were frequent (Fig.
In progressive nonfluent aphasia, the ability to match semantically related objects is preserved, but nonfluent speech, phonemic paraphasias (word substitutions), and agrammatism occur.
The third clinical variant, termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) by Gorno-Tempini et al, (9,13) is characterised by slow spontaneous speech output with frequent word-finding pauses and phonemic paraphasias. Several investigations have demonstrated that lvPPA is associated with atrophy of the posterior perisylvian and inferior parietal regions in the brain and is closely related to AD pathology.
However, the majority of her classifiable errors were semantic paraphasias (e.g., hammock [right arrow] swing, leaf [right arrow] flower, squeezing [right arrow] lemon) or descriptions (e.g., dripping [right arrow] drops are coming down) (Table 1).
There are also phonemic paraphasias, where the word or phrase produced is similar in sound to the target (e.g., "corned beef and garbage"), and semantic paraphasias, where the word or phrase is similar in meaning to the target (e.g., using "driving range" to mean "parking lot").
Various analyses have been performed of the role of similarity in phonological paraphasias. The classical study is Blumstein (1973).
However, while Patient l's confrontational naming skills were intact, Patient 2 did less well on the Boston Naming Test (Kaplan, Goodglass & Weintraub, 1983), with his low average performance characterised by many semantic paraphasias.
Experience with the sentence Pas de si ni de mais teaches us that it seems to be an adequate alternative, remaining true to the original concept examined (articulatory agility, comprehension and presence of paraphasias in repetition).