parapertussis


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parapertussis

 [par″ah-per-tus´is]
an acute respiratory disease clinically indistinguishable from mild or moderate pertussis, caused by Bordetella parapertussis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica.
Case report of respiratory mannheimiosis in sheep and goat complicated by Bordetella parapertussis. Nigerian Veterinary Journal, v.35, p.968-974, 2015.
M2 PHARMA-July 19, 2018-FDA Grants Quidel Clearance for Diagnostic Assay for Identification of Pertussis, Parapertussis Infections
parapertussis, constitute the bulk of Bordetella infections in humans causing upper respiratory tract disease, which is often characterized by three clinical phases: 1) Catarrhal, which consists of rhinorrhea, sneezing, and non-specific coughs; 2) Paroxysmal, which consists of more severe coughing spasms often resulting in vomiting (posttussive emesis); and 3) Convalescent, which consists of a mild, chronic cough which persists for months post infection.
Preston, "Bordetella parapertussis PagP mediates the addition of two palmitates to the lipopolysaccharide lipid A," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
Adverse weather conditions, stress, pregnancy, lactation, immuno-suppression and old age favours infection by normal inhabitants of respiratory tract pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bordetella parapertussis, Mycoplasma spp., Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Pasteurella spp.
Still, a similar to pertussis clinical entity caused by Bordetella parapertussis has been also described in humans [1].
parapertussis. It is a vaccine-preventable disease mainly affecting the respiratory tract.
Activity of new macrolides against Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis.
Moreover, under stress, immunocompromised, pregnant, lactating, and older animals easily fall prey to respiratory habitats, namely, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mannheimia haemolytica, Bordetella parapertussis, Mycoplasma species, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, and Pasteurella species [2, 4, 7-9, 12, 13].