paramedic


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paramedic

 [par″ah-med´ik]
a person trained to manage the emergency care of sick or injured persons during transport to a hospital, including administration of injections and intravenous fluids, reading of electrocardiograms, and performance of defibrillation and other advanced life-support measures if ordered by a physician. See also emergency medical technician.

par·a·med·ic

(par'ă-med'ik),
A person trained and certified to provide emergency medical care.

paramedic

(păr′ə-mĕd′ĭk)
n.
A person who is trained to give emergency medical treatment or assist medical professionals.

paramedic

As defined in the UK, a senior, and often the first, ambulance service healthcare professional at the scene of an accident or medical emergency. Paramedics may work alone—when deployed in a car, motorbike or bicycle—or with the support of an emergency care assistant or ambulance technician—if in an emergency van—and field triage a patient, resuscitate, provide advanced life support or stabilise him or her using the tools at their disposal, including defibrillators, spinal and traction splints, IV drips, oxygen and drugs.

Entry requirements
The traditional, experience-based route to becoming a paramedic (grandfather system) is no longer open to new entrants. Paramedics now either enter through a student paramedic position with an ambulance service trust, or attend an approved full-time course in paramedic science at a university. Courses are often modular with flexible entry and exit points, depending upon the candidate’s academic qualifications and relevant experience, and last from 2 years (full time) to 5 years (part time). Training comprises both theory and practical clinical experience, including several weeks in various hospital departments. Much of the training of paramedics is carried out under the supervision of senior doctors.

paramedic

A health professional certified to perform advanced life support procedures–eg, intubation, defibrillation and administration of drugs under a physician's direction; paramedics provide urgent care from an emergency vehicle or air service; in contrast, EMTs can only perform basic life-support. Cf EMT, Physicians' assistant, Physician extender.

pre·hos·pi·tal pro·vid·er

(prē-hos'pi-tăl prŏ-vī'dĕr)
One who provides care in case of medical emergency or trauma.
Synonym(s): emergency medical technician, paramedic.

paramedic

Any health-care worker other than a doctor, nurse, or dentist. The ranks of the paramedics include trained ambulance personnel, first aiders, laboratory technicians, PHYSIOTHERAPISTS, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS, ORTHOPTISTS and RADIOGRAPHERS. See also PROFESSIONS ALLIED TO MEDICINE.

par·a·med·ic

(par'ă-med'ik)
A person trained and certified to provide emergency care.
References in periodicals archive ?
It follows a change in UK legislation in April 2018 - followed by Welsh amendments this year - which allows advanced paramedics to be trained to prescribe from a formulary of medications.
On the other hand, almost 30pc of sick days taken by paramedics in the East Midlands were because of stress (3.7 days per staff member).
Balochistan protest: Doctors, paramedics boycott wards
I envisage the hospital-based paramedic as a collaborative role that will add value to the departments in which they will work.
Paramedics from the Palatine, Rolling Meadows and the Palatine Rural fire departments are to collaborate in their coverage areas to work for Northwest Community's mobile integrated health care pilot, which is designed to improve patient outcomes by reducing preventable hospital visits and readmissions.
Once they reached the woman, the paramedics saw the South African performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on his friend and when they tried to move him away because he was drunk, the dentist assaulted them.
Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, is also in favour, and said: "Increasing the treatments offered by paramedics closer to people's homes is another significant step in transforming emergency care."
North West Ambulance Service chiefs say they try to send paramedics in every ambulance but cannot always do so - a sign of the huge pressures on the NHS.
"Not all patients require a paramedic or even hospital admission and, in light of the national paramedic shortage, it is even more important to ensure the additional clinical skills of our paramedics are reserved for those patients who need them."
Community paramedicine broadens the role of emergency responders beyond the traditional paramedic training that has existed since the 1970s and that focuses on stabilizing patients as they are transported to hospitals.