paralytic shellfish toxin

paralytic shellfish toxin

multisymptomatic presentation (for example, tingling, drowsiness, paralysis); possibly life-threatening, caused by Alexandrium and Gonyaulax spp. Caused by ingestion of affected shellfish.
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Paralytic shellfish toxin concentrations were subsequently used to calculate estimated sample toxicities in terms of micrograms STX di-HCl equivalents per kilogram.
Comparative studies on paralytic shellfish toxin profiles of marine snails, mussels and an Alexandrium tamarense isolate from the Mar Del Plata coast (Argentina).
A/D) LC/MS analysis of paralytic shellfish toxin in shellfish harvested from the Ketchikan area in 2011 including butter clam (A), cockle (B), mussel (C), and clam (D).
The illness of 26 and death of 2 people in southeast Alaska as a result of PSP in 2010 through 2012 illustrates the need for change in the way paralytic shellfish toxins are monitored and managed in Alaska.
Paralytic shellfish toxin profile in starins of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum Graham and the scallop Argopecten ventricosus G.
Gonyaulax washingtonensis, its relationship to Mytilus californianus and Crassostrea gigas as a source of paralytic shellfish toxin in Sequim Bay, Washington.
The closure is due to elevated levels of paralytic shellfish toxins and includes mussels on all beaches, rocks, jetties and bay entrances in that section of the coast.
However, there are reports [1] indicating that there are other marine dinoflagellates that contribute to the occurrence of paralytic shellfish toxins.
A new study published in Nature magazine reveals the molecular basis for resistance and accumulation of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in softshell clams.
If successful, this technology may be used to guarantee safe human consumption of canned or cooked shellfish, insuring that paralytic shellfish toxins have been reduced to acceptable consumption levels.
Elevated levels of paralytic shellfish toxins has forced the closure of the entire Oregon Coast to mussel harvesting, according to the state Department of Agriculture and the Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Uptake, distribution and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins from Alexandrium minutum in Australian greenlip abalone, Haliotis laevigata.