paralytic shellfish poisoning


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paralytic shellfish poisoning

a spectrum of neurologic symptoms secondary to saxitoxin (q.v.) ingestion, including oral, facial, and other paresthesias; gastrointestinal upset, including nausea, emesis, and diarrhea; weakness and paralysis; death is uncommon.
Synonym(s): saxitoxin poisoning

paralytic shellfish poisoning

paralytic shellfish poisoning

Abbreviation: PSP
Poisoning after ingestion of shellfish contaminated by toxic marine algae that produce saxitoxin. Saxitoxin alters cell membrane permeability to sodium ions. It causes numbness and tingling, nausea and vomiting, and, in severe intoxications, paralysis and respiratory failure. Care includes the administration of intravenous fluids, respiratory support, and the oral administration of activated charcoal.
See also: poisoning

paralytic

1. pertaining to paralysis.
2. an animal affected with paralysis.

paralytic bladder
see atonic neurogenic urinary bladder.
paralytic ileus
loss of all intestinal tone and motility as a result of reflex inhibition in acute peritonitis, from excessive handling during bowel surgery, prolonged and severe distention due to intestinal obstruction and in grass sickness of horses. The effect is the same as that of an acute intestinal obstruction. Called also ileus, adynamic ileus.
paralytic myoglobinuria
a disease of horses characterized by red-brown urine due to myoglobinuria, and acute myopathy with muscle weakness, often to the point of being unable to get up. It occurs after exercise after several days of inaction while still being fed a high-energy ration. Called also azoturia and Monday morning disease.
paralytic rabies
see rabies.
paralytic shellfish poisoning
syndrome of flaccid paralysis after ingestion of bivalve molluscs whose tissues have accumulated tetrahydroxypurine toxins from some marine dinoflagellates; syndrome identical with tetrodotoxin poisoning. See also saxitoxin. Called also PSP.

shellfish

an aquatic animal having a shell; includes molluscs, e.g. oyster, and crustaceans, e.g. shrimp, lobster.

paralytic shellfish poisoning
see paralytic shellfish poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Receptor binding assay for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins: optimization and interlaboratory comparison.
Paralytic shellfish poisoning was found to range from just more than the detection limit to a maximum value of 22,468 [micro]g STX eq/kg in 1 viscera sample.
Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins.
Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning is similar to paralytic shellfish poisoning, but with somewhat milder symptoms.
Paralytic shellfish poisoning is intracellular but can be disrupted and released into the medium when cells are damaged or disrupted.
KEY WORDS: scallop, Pecten novaezelandiae, Alexandrium tamarense, Alexandrium margalefi, paralytic shellfish poisoning, clearance rate
Paralytic shellfish poisoning in Haliotis tuberculata from the Galician coast: geographical distribution, toxicity by lengths and parts of the mollusc.
Levels of domoic acid and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), also known as "red tide," have continued to drop below that level considered unsafe in this area, though state health officials noted that low levels of both naturally occurring toxins remain in the edible "meat" of the clams.
Because this leads to an increased risk of paralytic shellfish poisoning from shellfish consumption, a number of studies are underway to understand this mutation better.
monihttum has not been associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning (Owen & Norris 1982).
carchariae disease outbreak, oil spills, and paralytic shellfish poisoning.
Here we summarize the origins of the safety levels for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxins.