paralytic shellfish poisoning


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paralytic shellfish poisoning

a spectrum of neurologic symptoms secondary to saxitoxin (q.v.) ingestion, including oral, facial, and other paresthesias; gastrointestinal upset, including nausea, emesis, and diarrhea; weakness and paralysis; death is uncommon.
Synonym(s): saxitoxin poisoning

paralytic shellfish poisoning

paralytic shellfish poisoning

Abbreviation: PSP
Poisoning after ingestion of shellfish contaminated by toxic marine algae that produce saxitoxin. Saxitoxin alters cell membrane permeability to sodium ions. It causes numbness and tingling, nausea and vomiting, and, in severe intoxications, paralysis and respiratory failure. Care includes the administration of intravenous fluids, respiratory support, and the oral administration of activated charcoal.
See also: poisoning

paralytic

1. pertaining to paralysis.
2. an animal affected with paralysis.

paralytic bladder
see atonic neurogenic urinary bladder.
paralytic ileus
loss of all intestinal tone and motility as a result of reflex inhibition in acute peritonitis, from excessive handling during bowel surgery, prolonged and severe distention due to intestinal obstruction and in grass sickness of horses. The effect is the same as that of an acute intestinal obstruction. Called also ileus, adynamic ileus.
paralytic myoglobinuria
a disease of horses characterized by red-brown urine due to myoglobinuria, and acute myopathy with muscle weakness, often to the point of being unable to get up. It occurs after exercise after several days of inaction while still being fed a high-energy ration. Called also azoturia and Monday morning disease.
paralytic rabies
see rabies.
paralytic shellfish poisoning
syndrome of flaccid paralysis after ingestion of bivalve molluscs whose tissues have accumulated tetrahydroxypurine toxins from some marine dinoflagellates; syndrome identical with tetrodotoxin poisoning. See also saxitoxin. Called also PSP.

shellfish

an aquatic animal having a shell; includes molluscs, e.g. oyster, and crustaceans, e.g. shrimp, lobster.

paralytic shellfish poisoning
see paralytic shellfish poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection and identification of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in Florida pufferfish responsible for incidents of neurologic illness.
Paralytic shellfish poisoning outbreaks have been observed in shellfish sampled during both summer and winter blooms of toxic phytoplankton.
Researchers at the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health will focus on saxitoxins, a group of more than 20 neurotoxins that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning.
Members of the genus Alexandrium can produce powerful neurotoxins that accumulate in filter-feeding shellfish, causing debilitating or lethal paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans and other higher trophic consumers (1).
Hazardous levels of toxin, causing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) may be present in the mussels, according to Huff.
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today reissued and extended a public health warning against collecting shellfish on the Waikato west coast due to Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins being detected at levels of concern.
BFAR's bulletin issued last Thursday warned that the coast of Alaminos City is now positive with the red tide toxin which may cause paralytic shellfish poisoning.
The state Department of Agriculture on Monday announced the closure of the entire Oregon Coast to recreational mussel and clam harvesting, from the mouth of the Columbia River to the California border, because of elevated levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning, or PSP, toxins.
Perhaps the most striking example of this is the complete loss of the wild shellfish resource in Alaska--which once produced 5 million pounds annually--to persistent paralytic shellfish poisoning.
The cases in this report occurred after eating pufferfish but are consistent with paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP).
Alaska's clammers will appreciate that ASTF pledged $311,000 to team up with Jellett Biotek, which put up more than $825,000 to come up with a way to test clams for signs of paralytic shellfish poisoning and amnesiac shellfish poisoning, infrequent killers in coastal villages or where subsistence activities are high.