paralogism


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par·a·lo·gi·a

, paralogism , paralogy (par'ă-lō'jē-ă, pă-ral'ŏ-jizm, -jē)
False reasoning, involving self-deception.
[G. paralogia, a fallacy, fr. para, beside, + logos, reason]

paralogism

(par?a-lo'jiz-em)
An incorrectly chosen word inserted into speech, esp. in patients with fluent aphasias.
See: neologism; paraphasia
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References in periodicals archive ?
A close reading in this spirit of the paralogisms (his proof that certain dogmatic assertions of rational psychology are formally fallacious) begins in the second chapter with the chief features of the soul treated in the first two paralogisms.
The paper considers Kant's criticism of rational psychology in the Paralogisms of Pure Reason in light of his German predecessors.
It proceeds in two steps: The Paralogisms of Rational Psychology prove that we cannot make any legitimate causal judgments about merely temporal objects or events, while the Analogies of Experience prove that we can make legitimate causal judgments only about spatio-temporal substances.
21) Kant argues in the Paralogisms (in both editions) against out knowledge of a substantial self, and he argues that in psychology we have no evidence of any extended substance.
My chief aim is to assess the extent to which Fichte was able to deal successfully with Kant's dualism of the cognitive powers without transgressing the cognitive boundaries specified in the Kritik der reinen Vernunft, that is, without falling victim to the fallacies of rational psychology exposed by Kant in the Paralogisms of Pure Reason.
41) The relevance of Kant's views on substance to his conception of the substrate of thought, the psyche or soul, can be glimpsed in an important passage from the Paralogisms of 1781:
The reading is compatible with Kant's claim in the Paralogisms that we cannot know what the "I" consists in metaphysically.
As one would expect, Keller has extended discussions of the A and B deductions, the Analogies of Experience, the Paralogisms, and the Refutation of Idealism.
The first is Kant's skeptical attack on the claims of pure reason to epistemic authority, where the focus is on the paralogisms and the antinomies of pure reason.