parallel play


Also found in: Wikipedia.

parallel play

Etymology: Gk, parallelos + AS, plegan, to play
a form of play among a group of children, primarily toddlers, in which each engages in an independent activity that is similar to but not influenced by or shared with the others. Compare cooperative play. See also associative play, solitary play.
Play which is typical of very young children, in which the child engages in independent play, without interacting with other children. The parallel play stage is normal until the child is toilet-trained, after which associative and interactive play develops

parallel play

Psychology Play typical of very young children, in which the child engages in independent play, without interacting with other children; the PP stage is normal until the child is toilet-trained, after which associative and interactive play develops

pa·ral·lel play

(par'ă-lel plā)
A developmental psychology concept in which toddlers (ages 2-3 years) play alongside each other, in similar activities, without obvious communication or interaction. Children younger than that tend to play by themselves (solitary play). Older children (preschool age) interact with each other more during group play.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of parallel play (the term perhaps borrowed from child psychology?
once looking up to see, happy in each other's parallel play.
The entry tactics "wait and hover" as well as mimicking (Dodge & Schlundt, 1983), synchronous play (Ramsey & Lasquade, 1996), and parallel play (Beilinson & Olswang, 2003) have been used to code behaviors in which the child seeking entry stands back and watches or copies the play scenario.
This demonstrates the incredible power of mimicking animal behavior, referred to as parallel play.
Elaine Savory traces Brathwaite's reinvention of the short story form through poetry and national language since the 1950s while Shirley Chew illuminates a parallel play between poetry and prose in the work of Olive Senior.
What can be quite comical are the "parallel conversations" that sometimes accompany parallel play.
Often, these disparate systems lose track of the child underneath the diagnosis, and engage in a sort of parallel play, buffeting the child back and forth like a rubber ball, with little effect on the child's ability to function in the world.
Social play behaviors included Cooperative, Associative, Parallel Aware, and Parallel Play Behaviors whereas nonsocial play behaviors consisted of Solitary Play, Onlooker, Unoccupied, Transition, Aggression, and Other Nonsocial play behaviors.
His next book of poems, Parallel Play, will be published in early 2006 by Graywolf.
Weights were assigned based on the assumption that play develops in a hierarchical order (Parten, 1932); weights of 1 to 4 were assigned to behaviors representing non-play, solitary play, parallel play, and group play, respectively.
Just as our four-year-old students move from playing independently to parallel play to cooperation and finally collaboration, we have seen our staff move to true collaboration with the teacher-librarian.
Parallel play was recorded where the child had one or more children playing in close proximity with whom the child did not interact (or if so, only fleetingly) and whose presence did not substantially affect his or her behaviour.

Full browser ?