paralanguage

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paralanguage

(par″ă-lang′gwăj) [ para- + language]
Nonverbal elements in communication, including loudness, tone of voice, and, at times, facial expressions and body language.
References in periodicals archive ?
As John actively mirrors, shadows, the Cross, his physical posture might suggest a paralinguistic counter-image to the Hitler salute --that erect, aggressive elevation and thrust of one arm.
Batliner (2014) Computational paralinguistics: emotion, affect and personality in speech and language processing.
Paralinguistic cues are affected by the gender of not only patients but also of doctors and nurses14.
one ichi two ni three san four yon five go one ichi two ni Speaker Paralinguistic notes (where applicable) Teacher Holds up A4 sheet of paper and Connect language with points Points to sheet of paper for each number Speaker Teacher reading Example 2: Japanese In this example tracing is used to emphasise the written style of language.
Narayanan, "The Interspeech 2010 paralinguistic challenge," in International Conference on Spoken Language Processing (INTERSPEECH), Makuhari, Japan, 26-30 September 2010.
Descriptive verbs are the most meaningful reporting verbs with regard to the creation of fictional personalities, since they refer to phonological and paralinguistic features that contribute to the expression of attitudes by the speaker rather than to the content of speech itself (Brown 1990, 112).
On the basis of these vocal qualities, what we call "paralinguistic cues," we form opinions about people (about their emotional states as well as about their status, sex, and various other characteristics), about potential conversational exchanges (when to talk and when to keep silent, for example), and about whether to believe or not to believe the speaker.
A recent distinction, based on our understanding of fundamental neuroregulatory systems [14], has been made between pain behaviors that are automatic and reflexive in nature, such as nociceptive reflexes, facial expression and paralinguistic features of vocalizations, and controlled or deliberate actions, such as self-report, help seeking, and self-administering medication [15,16].
Results of the study showed that patients have difficulties in using linguistic, extralinguistic, and paralinguistic expressive modalities both in the comprehension and in the production of various types of pragmatic tasks, as direct and indirect speech acts, irony and deceit.
In 2013 the INTERSPEECH Paralinguistic Challenge [27] raised interest in automatic detection of fillers providing a standardized corpus and a reference system.
The book starts from basics by defining spoken discourse as distinct from speech in that discourse includes the reciprocal interactions of linguistic and paralinguistic meaning with social contexts, then builds an interdisciplinary framework for studying spoken discourse using tools from linguistics, sociology, anthropology, and critical theory.