paralanguage

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paralanguage

(par″ă-lang′gwăj) [ para- + language]
Nonverbal elements in communication, including loudness, tone of voice, and, at times, facial expressions and body language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Normally, both in and beyond fiction, this function is usually only acknowledged in the case of those verbs that describe phonological or paralinguistic features that reveal meaningful attitudes about the person(a) whose words are being reported.
This requires making use of conversation analysis with reference to the prosodic and paralinguistic cues of speech to infer, translate and document meaning.
Similarly, public speech is different from genres of written discourse, such as political pamphlets, as public speech uses various subtle paralinguistic devices of pitch, pause, and pace for conveying various shades of meaning which is not possible in written discourse.
2) Seven percent is due to the words alone, 38 percent depends upon paralinguistic delivery and 55 percent from facial expressions.
The Use of the Paralinguistic Sympathetic Ingressive Affirmative in Speakers of English in the St.
In communicating with subordinates, individuals who score highly on imposterism are predicted to seek media that minimize the chance of cue leakage, that is, they will seek media that are limited in terms of transmission velocity, multiplicity of cues, personal focus and paralinguistic cues.
Borg (2011) suggests that human communication consists of 93 percent body language and paralinguistic cues.
Furthermore, he uses a variety of gestural and paralinguistic cues to invest this statement with maximum dramatic force, leading Ira Nadel, for one, to assert that Cohen proclaims his attraction to death "with bravado" (51).
One must also comprehend the complex tropes, mythologies, subtle paralinguistic gestures, imaginings, and narrative strategies that are deployed to frame who they have been or will be.
Firstly, they are intended to stimulate students' awareness of the extralinguistic and paralinguistic aspects of communication through a focus on pronunciation and gestures.
Coupled with phenomena found in English-based computer-mediated communication (such as symbols and emoticons, and Japanese-specific graphs such as gyal-moji, or girl-graphs), these signs do not merely compensate writing's lack of paralinguistic information, but have a phatic function that enables those communicating to 'create a comfortable communicative environment' (Miyake, 2007: 70).
Direct observation is also essential in the development of performance indicators (verbal, nonverbal and paralinguistic behaviors) and information about the immediate contingencies that permit showing the criteria of social competence (Del Prette & Del Prette, 2006).