paradox

(redirected from paradoxically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word to meaan simply 'something unusual or unexpected'.
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

paradox

Vox populi A thing that appears illogical or counterintuitive to that which is known to be correct. See Anion paradox, Asher's paradox paradox, C value paradox, Calcium paradox, French paradox, Glucose paradox, Grandfather paradox, Oxygen paradox, Sherman paradox.

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the years, many authors have observed that there is more to the problem than concha bullosa and a paradoxically bent middle turbinate.
Paradoxically, the execu tioner had an important role in the curing of disease.
Moreover, he maintains, it suggests that "paradoxically, the people who are most likely to be affected by ozone may be the healthiest, most robust individuals"--those with the stamina to exercise despite unhealthy air.
Yet, paradoxically, those who are confident about their beliefs can afford to respect the beliefs and positions of others.
The straight-forward text will help beginners build necessary connections about the complex writings of this prolific, paradoxically inward- and outward-turning writer, who still appeals to today's reader because of his rebellion against expected norms.
In stark colors, Collier portrays Franklin and Eleanor's deficiencies as parents, describing how FDR "mistakenly assumed" that his daughter and sons "would not feel entangled in the dark undergrowth of emotion that characterized his relationship to Eleanor." This "made the family, in Tolstoy's formulation, unhappy in its own distinctive way." FDR is shown as "a blithe spirit and a figure of tremendous power, yet paradoxically unable to protect [his children]--not from tyrannical nannies, not from their mother's painful deficits, and not from his own relentless desire to pretend everything was fine, his way of conserving the core of privacy he had won with such difficulty."
Paradoxically, Canadian Catholics have reason to be satisfied with the outcome of the recent election, since for the first time in half a century no Catholic Prime Minister was either elected or was left waiting in the wings.
When we watch Neshat's films--which are paradoxically both short and epic--we are thus seeing something both personal and political.
King David's own character manifested in such diverse roles as commander, father, murderer, poet, and "a man after God's own heart" in scripture; it is these at times paradoxically conflicting roles that make his story fascinating reading from cover to cover.
Paradoxically, this cosmopolitan trajectory has led him back to his roots, as evinced by this little restaurant in Bali which draws intelligently on vernacular forms and materials, especially bamboo.
Paradoxically, a surplus of oligodendrocytes early in brain development may lead to a dearth later, because if there are proportionally fewer neurons, many oligodendrocytes cannot wrap an axon or reproduce.
"Paradoxically the amount of accurate information in those volumes might fill a shelf." (p.8) Although Derr's work covers some familiar territory in sections on the history of the wolf and dog, it is soon obvious that Dog's Best Friend is not just another title in that "large library." Most noteworthy are chapters dealing with professional dog breeders and the American Kennel Club.