parabiosis


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parabiosis

 [par″ah-bi-o´sis]
1. the union of two individuals, as conjoined twins, or of experimental animals by surgical operation.
2. temporary suppression of conductivity and excitability. adj., adj parabiot´ic.

par·a·bi·o·sis

(par'ă-bī-ō'sis),
1. Fusion of whole oocytes or embryos, which occurs in some forms of conjoined twins.
2. Surgical joining of the vascular systems of two organisms.
[para- + G. biōsis, life]

parabiosis

/para·bio·sis/ (-bi-o´sis) the union of two individuals, as conjoined twins, or of experimental animals by surgical operation.parabiot´ic

parabiosis

(păr′ə-bī-ō′sĭs)
n. pl. parabio·ses (-sēz)
1. The natural or surgical union of anatomical parts of two organisms, usually involving exchange of blood, as in the development of conjoined twins or in certain transplant operations.
2. A temporary suspension of conductivity or excitability in a nerve.

par′a·bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.
par′a·bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

parabiosis

[-bī·ō′sis]
the fusion of two eggs or embryos, resulting in conjoined twins.

par·a·bi·o·sis

(par'ă-bī-ō'sis)
1. The fusion of embryos, as occurs in conjoined twins.
2. Surgical joining of the vascular systems of two organisms.
[para- + G. biōsis, life]

parabiosis

the connecting together of two animals in an experiment so as to allow their body fluids to mix. The technique is used, for example, in the study of the role of insect hormones.

parabiosis

1. the union of two individuals, as conjoined twins, or of experimental animals by surgical operation.
2. temporary suppression of conductivity and excitability.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous studies on somatic and germline chimerism have mainly focused on parabiosis between equivalent-sized, sexually mature adults.
We wondered whether the patterns of germline and somatic chimerism would differ if the parabiosis occurred when the genotypes were juveniles, months prior to sexual maturity.
Parabiosis describes the surgical attachment of two living organisms, so that they share a common vascular system with continuous exchange of soluble factors at physiological levels.
Parabiosis was shown to confer longevity 43 years ago.
Parabiosis research peaked in the early 1970s and then stopped inexplicably.
Parabiosis gained popularity during the 1960s and 1970s, but eventually fell out of wide practice.
Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, cardiologists find that parabiosis reverses age-related thickening of the walls of the heart.
A 2015 published study combined pulse-chase labeling and parabiosis in the mouse model to show that circulating cells derived from the parabiont expressed cardiac-specific markers in the injured myocardium.
In Revival of Parabiosis, Young Blood Rejuvenates Aging Microglia, Cognition ALZFORUM, May 5, 2014.
Inhibition of the immune responses of young adult CBA mice due to parabiosis with their old partners.