papulovesicular


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Related to papulovesicular: papular

papulovesicular

 [pap″u-lo-vĕ-sik´u-lar]
marked by papules and vesicles.

pap·u·lo·ve·sic·u·lar

(pap'yū-lō-ve-sik'yū-lăr),
Denoting an eruption composed of papules and vesicles.

pap·u·lo·ve·sic·u·lar

(pap'yū-lō-vĕ-sik'yū-lăr)
Denoting an eruption composed of papules and vesicles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The clinical spectrum spans from herpangina, characterized by fever and painful mouth ulcers most prominent in the posterior oral cavity (uvula, tonsils, soft palates, and anterior pharyngeal folds), to HFMD with papulovesicular rash on palms and soles with or without mouth ulcers/vesicles.
Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is an asymptomatic, symmetric, papulovesicular dermatosis that involves the face, limbs, and buttocks of children 2 to 6 years of age.
These lesions usually disappear 1-2 days after menstruation ceases.2 Skin lesions include urticaria, angioedema, erythema multiforme, eczema, folliculitis, papulovesicular eruptions, fixed drug eruption, purpura, or vulvovaginal pruritus.
A suspected case of HFMD was defined as the occurrence of multiple erythematous papulovesicular lesions on the legs, arms, face, or oral mucosa in a person involved in basic military training activities at Lackland AFB during July 6-September 18.
Typical pustular or pruritic papulovesicular lesions that are often chronic and recurrent are the characteristic features of infantile acropustulosis4,5.
Papulovesicular eruption located on the face and extremities in a child.
This disease manifests as itchy erythematous papules and papulovesicular lesions on exposed areas of the body.
Possible complications include erythema multiforme, a papulovesicular rash affecting the skin and mucosal surfaces, lenticular or maculopapular rashes, and lymphangitis.
In addition to a papulovesicular rash on the palms, soles, and/or buttocks, 89 (90%) HFMD patients showed a perioral papulovesicular rash that did not extend to the rest of the face.
Rare associations with papulovesicular eruptions have also been described, including a bullous pemphigoid-like eruption (5), (8).
Although of limited clinical significance, a number of animal and plant mite infestations can cause bothersome, usually self-limited, erythematous, papulovesicular eruptions.
Patients who have recently had their skin penetrated by the filariform larvae may acquire an itchy cutaneous eruption of pruritic papulovesicular lesion.