pappus

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pap·pus

(pap'ŭs),
The first downy growth of beard.
[G. pappos, down]

pappus

[pap′əs]
Etymology: Gk, pappos, down
the first growth of beard, characterized by downy hairs.

pappus

(păp′pŭs) [L.]
The first growth of beard hair appearing on the cheeks and chin as fine, downy hair.

pappus

a circle of hairs formed from a modified CALYX found on the seeds of plants of the family Compositae, for example dandelion and thistle seeds. The pappus assists in the dispersal of the seeds by wind, acting as a kind of parachute.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pappi, Die Links-Rechts-Dimension des deutschen Parteiensystems und die Parteipraferenz-Profile der Wahlerschaft'(The Left-Right Dimension of the German Party System and Party Preference profile of Voters).
Apart from being "an annoying [and unconvincing] foreign do-gooder" (Rosenthal, 2004:5), she is, like Pappi, Matyas and Dr Belotti, a good white person, because she is a foreign white person, or so the narrative appears to demonstrate.
The opening section of the exhibition lays down scholarly foundations, based primarily on research by Gianni Pappi demonstrating that Ribera's Roman years were by no means a mere 'prologue' to his move to Naples -rather, as indicated by his membership of the Academy of St Luke, they were a period of professional activity and success.
When word got out that we were having some pretty good success, we handed out a few flies to Justin's brother who runs a 50-foot G&S, the Pappi.
Tabinda Bukhari introduced the band, which had Shahid Pappi on the drum, Imtiaz Hussein on the tabla, Zahid Hussain on the dholak and Taufiq Hussain on the keyboard.
Team Pappi," they were dubbed by the announcer, and they wore consecutive numbers, 853 and 854.
Kenis 1991; Laumann and Knoke 1987; Pappi, Konig, and Knoke 1995; Schneider 1988; Schneider and Werle 1991).
I repeated the procedure until the different viewpoints gathered repeated themselves at least twice with different projects or groups (Laumann and Pappi, 1976).
Caucus structures have been found in empirical settings in communities, particularly polarized communities (Breiger 1979; Coleman 1957; Lauman and Pappi 1976).
Centrality can be broadly conceptualized as the degree to which the network or an individual in the network is in a position to influence others in the group or network (see for example, Brass, 1984; Laumann & Pappi, 1976; Pfeffer, 1981).