hyperplasia

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Related to papillary hyperplasia: Epulis fissuratum

hyperplasia

 [hi″per-pla´zhah]
abnormal increase in volume of a tissue or organ caused by the formation and growth of new normal cells. See also hypertrophy and proliferation. adj., adj hyperplas´tic.
benign prostatic hyperplasia benign prostatic hypertrophy.
cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia a group of benign cutaneous disorders characterized by accumulations of large numbers of lymphocytes and histiocytes in the skin, which may occur as a reaction to insect bites, allergy hyposensitization injections, light, trauma, or a tattoo pigment or may be of unknown etiology.
focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) a benign, usually asymptomatic tumor of the liver, occurring chiefly in women; it is a firm, nodular, highly vascular mass resembling cirrhosis, usually with a stellate fibrous core containing numerous small bile ducts, and having vessels lined by Kupffer cells.
nodular hyperplasia of the prostate benign prostatic hypertrophy.

hy·per·pla·si·a

(hī-pĕr-plā'zhē-ă),
An increase in the number of normal cells in a tissue or organ, excluding tumor formation, whereby the bulk of the part or organ may be increased.
See also: hypertrophy.
[hyper- + G. plasis, a molding]

hyperplasia

(hī′pər-plā′zhə)
n.
An abnormal increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ, with consequent enlargement of the part or organ.

hy′per·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

hyperplasia

An abnormal ↑ in number of cells in an organ or tissue, resulting in an increase in size

hy·per·pla·si·a

(hī'pĕr-plā'zē-ă)
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ, excluding tumor formation, whereby the bulk of the part or organ may be increased.
See also: hypertrophy
Compare: hypoplasia
[hyper- + G. plasis, a molding]

hyperplasia

An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ causing an increase in the size of the part. Hyperplasia is not a cancerous process. It is often a normal response to increased demand and ceases when the stimulus is removed. To be distinguished from HYPERTROPHY.

hyperplasia

an increase in tissue mass caused by an increase in cell number.

Hyperplasia

A condition where cells, such as those making up the prostate gland, rapidly divide abnormally and cause the organ to become enlarged.

hyperplasia

Any condition in which there is an increase in the number of cells in an organ or a tissue. It usually excludes tumour formation. Example: choroidal naevus.

hy·per·pla·si·a

(hī'pĕr-plā'zē-ă)
Increased number of normal cells in tissue or organ, excluding tumor formation, whereby bulk of the part or organ may be increased.
See also: hypertrophy
[hyper- + G. plasis, a molding]
References in periodicals archive ?
Papillary hyperplasia is seen most often as part of the spectrum of fibrocystic changes but occasionally occurs as pure papillary hyperplasia.
Juvenile papillomatosis is characterized by the presence of multiple dilated ducts and cysts, extensive UDH, extensive apocrine metaplasia, apocrine papillary hyperplasia, and intraductal and intracystic papillomas (Figure 1, a and b).
Juvenile papillomatosis is separated from other variants of papillary hyperplasia in children and young adults by the prominent cystic changes and apocrine metaplasia that are not part of the latter spectrum of lesions.
Epithelial atypia, metaplasia, and papillary hyperplasia without atypia were often present in the pancreatic ducts in CP and sometimes raised the differential diagnosis with intraductal papillary tumors and well-differentiated duct adenocarcinomas.
Percentage of p53-Positive Cells Within Various Papillary Entities in the WHO/ISUP Classification(*) Mean p53 Median p53 Range of p53 Entity Index, % Index, % Indices, % Papillary hyperplasia 0 0 0-0 Papilloma 0 0 0-0 Papillary urothelial neoplasm of LMP 0.4 0 0-2 Papillary urothelial carcinoma, low grade 2.9 1 0-20.5 Papillary urothelial carcinoma, high grade 25.7 8.5 0-100 (*) WHO/ISUP indicates World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology; LMP, low malignant potential.
In LMP papillary urothelial neoplasms, p53 expression was rarely noted (mean LI, 0.4%; median, 0%; range, 0%-2%) (Table 1); However, these lesions had increased Ki-67 positivity (mean LI, 2.5%; median, 1%; range, 0.5%-15%) compared with papillary hyperplasia and decreased expression compared with papilloma (Table 3), although these differences were not statistically significant.
The most recent WHO Classification of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs introduces the term urothelial proliferation of uncertain malignant potential (UPUMP) to serve as a unifying diagnosis for hyperplastic lesions previously diagnosed separately as flat urothelial hyperplasia" and "papillary urothelial hyperplasia." This simpler terminology generally makes sense since both flat and papillary hyperplasias are most frequently seen in follow-up of patients with a history of urothelial neoplasia (typically papillary neoplasms), and both lesions often share some of the early, common genetic alterations seen in urothelial carcinomas.