pantothenic acid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pantothenic acid

 [pan″to-then´ik]
a vitamin of the B complex present in all living tissues, almost entirely in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA). (See also vitamin.) This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. The daily requirement for this vitamin has not been established, and no definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps because of its wide occurrence in almost all foods. Intakes of 4 to 7 mg/day are safe and adequate for adults. Some symptoms attributed to deficiency of other B complex vitamins may be due to a lack of pantothenic acid.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tō-then'ik as'id),
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; dietary deficiency causes dermatitis in chicks, and dermatitis and achromotrichia in rats; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

(păn′tə-thĕn′ĭk)
n.
A yellow oily acid, C9H17NO5, belonging to and found widely in plant and animal tissues.

pantothenic acid

An essential nutrient involved in nutrient metabolism. Pantothetic acid (vitamin B5) is present in dairy products, egg yolks, leafy greens, legumes, liver and whole grains; it has been used by some alternative healthcare providers to treat allergies, anxiety, colitis, depression, eczema, fatigue, hay fever, hypoglycaemia, urticaria and to stimulate weakened adrenal glands. The recommended daily requirement is 100 mg.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

One of the B group of vitamins and a constituent of coenzyme A which has a central role in energy metabolism. Deficiency is rare.

pantothenic acid

or

vitamin B5

a water soluble organic acid (C9H17O5N) that is present in all animal tissues, especially the liver and kidney. Pantothenic acid forms part of coenzyme A which, when bonded to acetic acid, forms ACETYLCOENZYME A. The vitamin is present in almost all foods, especially fresh vegetables and meat, eggs and yeast. A deficiency causes nervous disorders with poor motor coordination.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.
References in periodicals archive ?
Median Dermatology Life Quality Index scores improved over the course of the study in both groups, although significantly more patients in the pantothenic acid group achieved at least a 4-point improvement over baseline, which is considered the minimum clinical ly important difference.
For other factors (pantothenic acid, sodium chloride and yeast extract) more studies amplifying the selected area would be interesting.
Among the most important fish species of South Caspian Sea, the richest source of vitamin content was as follows: Caspian kutum has the maximum vitamin A content; common kilka had the highest content of E, K, D and [B.sub.12], vitamins; pike perch has the highest content of vitamin C, pantothenic acid and folic acid; golden grey mullet has the maximum [B.sub.2], [B.sub.1], [B.sub.6] and biotin vitamins; and common carp has the highest content of niacin.
Pantothenic acid was detected with a diode array detector (DAD) and detecting wavelength was 245 nm.
High doses of biotin and pantothenic acid have no reported side effects although megadoses of pantothenic acid (10 g/d) have produced mild intestinal distress and diarrhoea.
But the formula has 2,200 mcg of pantothenic acid, which is 22,000 percent of its daily value, and 733.3 mg of L-Carnitine, whose daily value has yet to be established.
Vitamins have a chapter to themselves and the discussion areas are thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, cobalamin, folic acid, biotin and pantothenic acid, ascorbic acid, retinol, cholecalciferol, vitamin E and vitamin K.
2 IT IS also a source of essential vitamins such as folate, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid.
1 IT contains vitamins such as pantothenic acid, pyridoxine (vitamin B6), folic acid, niacin, riboflavin and thiamine plus vitamin C, which helps the body develop resistance against free radicals.
2 GINGER contains many essential vitamins such as pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and pantothenic acid (vitamin B5).
8,496,948 B2; Bath and Body Works Brand Management, Inc., Reynoldsburg, OH, has patented a cosmetic skin moisturizing composition that contains glycerin; beet root extract; aloe barbadensis leaf polysaccharides; retinol; ascorbic acid; tocopherol acetate; pantothenic acid; a yeast extract prepared From a saccharomyces zinc ferment; a yeast extract prepared from a saccharomyces copper ferment; a yeast extract prepared from a saccharomyces magnesium ferment; a yeast extract prepared from a saccharomyces iron ferment; a yeast extract prepared from.