pantothenic acid


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pantothenic acid

 [pan″to-then´ik]
a vitamin of the B complex present in all living tissues, almost entirely in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA). (See also vitamin.) This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. The daily requirement for this vitamin has not been established, and no definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps because of its wide occurrence in almost all foods. Intakes of 4 to 7 mg/day are safe and adequate for adults. Some symptoms attributed to deficiency of other B complex vitamins may be due to a lack of pantothenic acid.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tō-then'ik as'id),
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; dietary deficiency causes dermatitis in chicks, and dermatitis and achromotrichia in rats; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

/pan·to·the·nic ac·id/ (-ik) a component of coenzyme A and a member of the vitamin B complex; necessary for nutrition in some animal species, but of uncertain importance for humans.

pantothenic acid

(păn′tə-thĕn′ĭk)
n.
A yellow oily acid, C9H17NO5, belonging to and found widely in plant and animal tissues.

pantothenic acid

a vitamin of the B complex present in all living tissues, almost entirely in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA). This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. The daily requirement for this vitamin has not been established and no definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps due to its wide occurrence in almost all foods.

pantothenic acid

[pan′təthen′ik]
a member of the vitamin B complex. It is widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, almost entirely in the form of coenzyme A (CoA). This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. No definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps due to its wide occurrence in almost all foods.

pantothenic acid

An essential nutrient involved in nutrient metabolism. Pantothetic acid (vitamin B5) is present in dairy products, egg yolks, leafy greens, legumes, liver and whole grains; it has been used by some alternative healthcare providers to treat allergies, anxiety, colitis, depression, eczema, fatigue, hay fever, hypoglycaemia, urticaria and to stimulate weakened adrenal glands. The recommended daily requirement is 100 mg.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

One of the B group of vitamins and a constituent of coenzyme A which has a central role in energy metabolism. Deficiency is rare.

pantothenic acid

or

vitamin B5

a water soluble organic acid (C9H17O5N) that is present in all animal tissues, especially the liver and kidney. Pantothenic acid forms part of coenzyme A which, when bonded to acetic acid, forms ACETYLCOENZYME A. The vitamin is present in almost all foods, especially fresh vegetables and meat, eggs and yeast. A deficiency causes nervous disorders with poor motor coordination.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

a vitamin of the B complex group present in all living tissues as part of the coenzyme A (CoA) molecule or the acyl carrier protein.

pantothenic acid nutritional deficiency
a nutritional essential in all species other than ruminants which synthesize it in the rumen. Recorded as a natural occurrence only in poultry and pigs on heavy corn diets. Manifested in pigs by diarrhea, dermatitis, incoordination with a spastic gait and ulcerative colitis. Fowls show poor hatchability of eggs, poor feather development and dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 10-1 Usual vitamins supplemented in rations of healthy adult livestock Species Ruminants Swine Chickens Vitamin A [check] [check] [check] Vitamin D [check] [check] [check] Vitamin E [check] [check] [check] Vitamin K [check] [check] Thiamin [check] [check] Riboflavin [check] [check] Pyridoxine [check] [check] Pantothenic acid [check] [check] Niacin [check] [check] [B.
Pantothenic acid was detected with a diode array detector (DAD) and detecting wavelength was 245 nm.
High doses of biotin and pantothenic acid have no reported side effects although megadoses of pantothenic acid (10 g/d) have produced mild intestinal distress and diarrhoea.
Products include: Fortified non-fat blueberry and raspberry yogurt with calcium, iron and vitamins A, C, D and E; gumballs in grape, watermelon, cherry and bubble gum flavors (within only minutes of chewing, 100 percent of 11 essential vitamins are delivered); nutrition bars packed with a host of ingredients, including calcium, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, zinc and vitamins A, D, K B6 and B12; Fortified protein drink with calcium, iron and vitamins A, E, B12 and C.
RDA of thiamine, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, iodine, zinc and vitamins A, C and B6; 25 percent U.
Vitamins have a chapter to themselves and the discussion areas are thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, cobalamin, folic acid, biotin and pantothenic acid, ascorbic acid, retinol, cholecalciferol, vitamin E and vitamin K.
Each serving contains just 10 calories plus 150 mg of Vitamin C, 1 mg of Vitamin B6 and 3 mcg of Vitamin B12 plus Pantothenic Acid, Zinc and Chromium to help maintain electrolyte balance.
4 GOOSEBERRIES contain small amounts of essential vitamins such as pyridoxine (vitamin B6), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), folates and thiamin (vitamin B1).
Hit-Hung Leung, who researched the relationship between pantothenic acid and acne.
The next part of the vitamin B complex is B5 or pantothenic acid, which is used in shampoo because it helps maintain hair colour.