panting


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panting

Etymology: Fr, panteler, to gasp
a ventilatory pattern characterized by rapid, shallow breathing commonly used during labor. Panting usually moves gas back and forth in the anatomical dead space at a high flow rate, which evaporates water and removes heat but produces little or no alveolar ventilation. It does not usually cause carbon dioxide levels to be affected. Compare hyperventilation.

panting

(pant'ing) [ME. panten]
Short, shallow, rapid respirations. Synonym: polypnea

panting

rapid shallow breathing; a mechanism in furry animals for losing heat. In humans, not a normal physiological pattern of breathing. See also hyperventilation, tachypnoea.

panting

rapid, shallow breathing, a characteristic heat-losing reaction in dogs; represents an increase in dead-space ventilation resulting in heat loss without necessarily increasing oxygen uptake or carbon dioxide loss.

panting disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Panting is part of the respiratory system so it comes as no surprise that disorders in this system can lead to heavy breathing or panting.
Lower respiratory tract disorders may not allow for sufficient gas exchange at the level of the lung and result in panting in an attempt to increase the oxygen flow.
Any conditions that cause dysfunction of the muscles of respiration may contribute to panting.
Dogs can also have panic attacks; these acute episodes of intense anxiety are frequently accompanied by severe panting, shaking, and trembling with a rapid heart and respiratory rate and dilated pupils.
Panting is often associated with cognitive dysfunction, the mental deterioration that sometimes occurs as dogs age.
Panting can be associated with eclampsia, commonly known as milk fever, a low blood calcium level that can develop in the weeks after giving birth (usually due to an underactive thyroid gland).
Certain medications can produce panting as a side effect, including steroids such as prednisone, benzodiazepines (Diazepam/valium), opiods for pain management such as Fentanyl and Tramadol, and excess thyroxine supplementation (thyroid medication).
Allergies, irritation, and infection can all lead to increased panting and related wheezy noisy breathing.
Your cat should not be panting unless she's extremely stressed.
If your cat seems to be in severe pain (could be an obstructed urinary tract in a male, cats with blood clots or a bad fracture) which can cause panting.
Your cat has recently begun snoring, wheezing or panting at night.