panspermia


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pan·sper·mi·a

, panspermatism (pan-sper'mē-ă, -sper'mă-tizm),
The hypothetical doctrine of the omnipresence of minute forms and spores of animal and vegetable life, thus accounting for apparent spontaneous generation.
[pan- + G. sperma, seed]

panspermia

(păn-spûr′mē-ə)
n.
The theory that microorganisms or biochemical compounds from outer space are responsible for originating life on Earth and possibly in other parts of the universe where suitable environmental conditions exist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Explaining the origins of the panspermia theory in the work of the late Sir Fred Hoyle, "Our Cosmic Ancestry in the Stars" reveal the vast body of evidence that has accumulated over the past 4 decades in favor of the cosmic origins of life, including viral inserts found in DNA that have shaped our human genome over millions of years.
Wickramasinghe, "Astronomical Origin of life: Steps towards Panspermia," Kluwer, vol.
The post Panspermia and the Drake Equation appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
This research suggests that panspermia, while certainly not proven, is not impossible either.
En el cosmos, hipotesis de la panspermia (Svante Arrenius, Fred Hoyle y Francis Crick); en granos de polvo interestelar; en particulas de hielo sucio de un cometa; en el oceano; en una laguna; en un charco; en una fisura de roca; entre capas de arcilla; cerca de fuentes termales; en una dorsal oceanica; bajo el hielo de los polos.
Orgel, "Directed Panspermia," Icarus 19 (1973): 341-6.
Dawkins' principal strategy, consuming roughly half of his essay, is to focus on "directed panspermia," (aka "exogenesis"), the irrelevant notion that life on Earth was "seeded" by life forms residing elsewhere in the universe.
Or they may have gotten a ride to Venus on debris splashed into space during impacts on Earth, an interplanetary "seeding" termed panspermia (S&T January 2007, page 34).
That life appeared on earth so quickly after it provided an environment hospitable to life is quite astounding, and has given rise to the hypothesis of panspermia, the arrival of life from some other part of the universe.
The team led by Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe has been pioneering research into panspermia - the theory life began inside comets and then spread to habitable planets across the galaxy - for more than 25 years.
Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe and colleagues at the University's Centre for Astrobiology have long argued the case for panspermia - the theory that life began inside comets and then spread to habitable planets.