panoptic

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pan·op·tic

(pan-op'tik),
All-revealing, denoting the effect of multiple or differential staining.
[pan- + G. optikos, relating to vision]

panoptic

[panop′tik]
Etymology: Gk, pan, all, opsis, vision
pertaining to the enhanced visual effect produced by stains applied to microscopic specimens.

panoptic

(păn-ŏp′tĭk) [″ + optikos, vision]
Making every part visible.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bentham first introduced the idea of the Panopticon in various letters written in 1787.
The Britannia Panopticon began life in the late 1850s when 1500-strong crowds would cram in to watch acts of all shapes and sizes.
While she has the recurring fear of gothic faceless men in wide-brim hats hiding behind the observation window of The Panopticon care unit's watchtower, lest we dismiss this as a drug-induced paranoia, it is worth remembering that she makes a very astute political and philosophical point about contemporary society.
The aforementioned concepts of voluntary panopticon, lateral surveillance and self-surveillance could all be used to explain this phenomenon.
Of which, as I already emphasized above, the Foucault-Benthamian panopticon is a most recent philosophical articulation, stimulated to a degree by Foucault's own narcissistic dynamics and fascination with S/M (Miller, 1993).
But how do you get people to march happily into a panopticon when they know that everyone can see everything they do?
A decade after the defining crisis of our era, the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the United States of America is on the verge of becoming a Panopticon society, with powers of state surveillance far beyond the most fevered imaginings of Bentham and fellow premodern utopians.
From the perspective of the Panopticon (Foucault, 1977) Nadia's narrative was analyzed for her personal and situational experiences of joy and enjoyment.
The architecture of the checkpoint correlates to the principles of modern prisons, the Panopticon, the concept of the design is to allow an observer to observe all inmates of an institution without them being able to tell whether or not they are being watched, according to Michel Foucault's definition:
These features of Hardy's world-making suggest a universe run along the lines of the Panopticon, but without an eye of God in the central watchtower.
Jeremy Bentham's Panopticon is being built in miniature, but with an even wider angle of view.