panoptic


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pan·op·tic

(pan-op'tik),
All-revealing, denoting the effect of multiple or differential staining.
[pan- + G. optikos, relating to vision]

panoptic

(păn-ŏp′tĭk) [″ + optikos, vision]
Making every part visible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The filmmaker refused to make them and, in lieu of a Beirut release, briefly posted "Panoptic" online.
"The Panoptic Studio supercharges our research," Sheikh said.
If the first four chapters of the Panoptic part clarify debate positions, chapter 5 moves the argument further into the entrepreneurial realm in general, and the case of Britain in particular.
Thus, it is the pedestrian who at street level constantly creates and re-creates the city, which nevertheless remains inaccessible to his individual consciousness because he lacks the panoptic perspective that makes available not just the components (of the metropolis), but also the intricate, web-like connections between them.
I found this classification of medical models useful as the hospital-pathological period is where Foucault's analysis of the Birth of the Clinic (and of panoptic power) comes in.
As the note-taker and composer of his journal, English would be a panoptic, unidirectional watcher, if not for the fact that he is marked as a writer.
To clarify this, I outline two major approaches to the study of digital surveillance in the next section: one that draws significantly from a Weberian sociological tradition and an Orwellian cultural imaginary, and another that both draws from and attempts to move beyond Foucault's rendition of a panoptic society.
23 November 2015 - US-based digital advertising and marketing solutions provider Panoptic Media Marketing Inc has formally acquired America's Media Marketing Inc, a specialist in print media advertising consultancy services, the company said.
The panoptic perspective of the strategist effects a "transformation of the urban fact into the concept of a city." (9) The urban fact is the actual life being lived in the streets.
(17) The observed, Foucault suggests, is always "the object of information, never a subject in communication." Foucault notes also that the panopticon does not necessarily mean that subjects are to be seen without their recognition of the panoptic vision.