pannus


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Related to pannus: corneal pannus, abdominal pannus

pannus

 [pan´us]
1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying synovial cells on the inside of a joint capsule, usually occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or related articular rheumatism.
3. panniculus adiposus.
Schematic presentation of the pathologic changes in rheumatoid arthritis. The inflammation (synovitis) leads to pannus formation, obliteration of the articular space. From Damjanov, 2000.

pan·nus

, pl.

pan·ni

(pan'ŭs, pan'ī), A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface:
1. The inflammatory synovial tissue found in rheumatoid joints that covers the articular cartilages that progressively destroys the underlying articular cartilages; also found in other chronic granulomatous disease, including tuberculosis.
See also: corneal pannus.
2. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus.
[L. cloth]

pannus

/pan·nus/ (pan´us) [L.]
1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying the synovial cells on the inside of a joint.

pannus trachomato´sus  pannus of the cornea secondary to trachoma.

pannus

[pan′əs]
Etymology: L, cloth
an abnormal condition of the cornea, which becomes vascularized and infiltrated with granular tissue just beneath the surface. Pannus may develop in the inflammatory stage of trachoma or after a detached retina, glaucoma, iridocyclitis, or other degenerative eye disorder.

pannus

A reticulated membrane of granulation (reactive fibrovascular) tissue, which is typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific immune response by macrophages, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue.

pannus

Rheumatology A reticulated membrane of granulation–reactive fibrovascular tissue typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific response, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue

pan·nus

, pl. panni (pan'ŭs, -ī)
1. A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface.
2. The articular cartilages in rheumatoid arthritis and in chronic granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis.
3. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus
[L. cloth]

pannus

A membrane of fine blood vessels and fibrous tissue that spreads down over the cornea in TRACHOMA and other inflammatory corneal disorders causing loss of vision. A similar membrane can affect the inner linings of joints.

pannus

chronic inflammatory hyperplasia of synovial membrane of joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis; characterized by granulation tissue (infiltrated by inflammatory cells and releasing lytic enzymes) that intrudes into the affected joint space, eroding bone margins and articular cartilage

pannus 

Abnormal superficial vascularization of the cornea covering the upper half, or sometimes the entire cornea. It is characterized by a thick plexus of vessels. It is found in some cases of contact lens wear, mainly soft lenses. Pannus following contact lens wear is referred to as corneal vascularization. If induced by soft lenses, it can be reduced by changing to lenses of high oxygen transmissibility or ceasing contact lens wear. Deep corneal vascularization involving the stroma is usually the result of a disease process (e.g. interstitial keratitis, phlyctenular keratitis, severe long-standing trichiasis, trachoma).

pannus

1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying synovial cells on the inside of a joint capsule, usually occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or related articular rheumatism.
3. panniculus adiposus.

degenerative pannus
see chronic superficial keratitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The initial visit to neurosurgical outpatient clinic confirmed the clinical findings, with radiological findings of a 11-mm pannus behind the dens, with associated compression of the medulla and a syrinx (Fig.
In the standing position, the lateral extent of the pannus was marked bilaterally.
Physical examination of the abdomen showed an inflamed pannus extending from the flank to the groin region on the left side with areas of necrosis and purulent drainage consistent with a necrotizing soft tissue infection.
Three months after his operation, he had an abdominal lipectomy as the pannus was resting on the reconstructed penis and scrotum, causing excoriation.
phase 1: patient with slight limbal insufficiency, that refers a maximal of 2 corneal ulcers or erosions in the past 6 months, slight photophobia, and epiphora and also slight vascular pannus not exceeding 1 mm from the limbic arch and small disorders in the absorption of fluorescein (Figures 1(a) and 1(b));
23 Hua et al reported, microscopically and biochemically the effect of glucosamine, suppressed not only the increase in the swelling of joints and the arthritis score but also the histopathological changes of joints in adjuvant arthritis (synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation with cartilage erosion, and leukocyte infiltration.
The 'secret' payments sanctioned by club owner Carson Yeung to acting chairman Peter Pannus are perplexing.
In my own experience with obese patients, suprapubic pressure is often ineffective due to the presence of a large fat pad or pannus.
In an animal model of RA using human RA pannus implanted in SCID mice, infliximab alone was sufficient to suppress synovial inflammation, but the addition of MTX was necessary to also inhibit bone destruction.
All Doggles boast rugged polycarbonate (shatterproof) anti-fog lenses with 100 per cent UV protection, and are great for dogs with eye disorders such as pannus and light sensitivity.
Due to thick abdominal pannus, however, his stoma is less than ideal.
However, it may be difficult to get an accurate reading in the presence of pannus.