pang

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Related to pangs: birth pangs, fardels, Hunger pangs

pang

(pang),
A sudden sharp, brief pain.

pang

a sudden severe but temporary pain.

pang

A rarely used term for a sharp shooting, piercing, stabbing pain. While pang is still in popular (lay) use, it is no longer used in the working medical parlance given its nonspecificity.

pang

(pang)
A sudden sharp, brief pain.

pang

(pang)
A sudden sharp, brief pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the moment of birth pangs in women in childbirth with insufficiency of mitral valve there was the decrease of CO, compensatory growth of CR and essential decrease of cardiac output up to 5.
In a lithotomic position the decrease of CO, CI, SO and DF during birth pangs in women in childbirth with IMV was stated.
2001) the vertical position during labor promotes the abatement of pang and acceleration of cervical dilatation, decreasing the duration of the first period of labor.
Obstetrics then uncharacteristically intervenes in podiatry and birth pangs arrive to realign the feet, with the interference articulated by Rice as follows: "What we're seeing here, in a sense, is the growing -- the birth pangs of a new Middle East and whatever we do we have to be certain that we're pushing forward to the new Middle East not going back to the old one.
The cast of characters in Rice's principal metaphor can be determined if we assume that birth pangs generally occur in the mother, after which it becomes clear that:
Birth pangs can sometimes occur in the form of aerial bombardments.
Nor has the Pang brothers' film - which plods in the numerous action sequences and relies on directorial brio to compensate for paltry character development and linear plotting - got the same flaws which afflicted the 1999 version.
Like the original, the new Bangkok Dangerous draws heavily on the Pang brothers' visual flourishes, underpinned by sterling work from cinematographer Decha Simantra.
This is fine if you foresee eternal paradise at the end of the road, but those of us not expecting the imminent end of the world would probably prefer fewer pangs and more stability.
Ched Myers connects these birth pangs to cycles of violence and war.
Those of us who live in the midst of the birth pangs have much to look forward to and much work to do.
Problem is director Pang can't keep his finger off the hype button for very long, with flashily edited sequences and a pounding music track elbowing their way into the story at regular intervals.