pang

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Related to pangs: birth pangs, fardels, Hunger pangs

pang

(pang),
A sudden sharp, brief pain.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pang

A rarely used term for a sharp shooting, piercing, stabbing pain. While pang is still in popular (lay) use, it is no longer used in the working medical parlance given its nonspecificity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pang

(pang)
A sudden sharp, brief pain.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pang

(pang)
A sudden sharp, brief pain.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of the analysis showed that in lithotomic position the average figures of CO during birth pangs were 6.6 [+ or -] 0.23 l/min and in a sitting posture--7.4 [+ or -] 0.32 l/min.
At the moment of birth pangs in women in childbirth with insufficiency of mitral valve there was the decrease of CO, compensatory growth of CR and essential decrease of cardiac output up to 5.6 [+ or -] 0.25 l/min was registered in supine posture as opposed to 7.2 [+ or -] 0.33 l/min in vertical position.
In a lithotomic position the decrease of CO, CI, SO and DF during birth pangs in women in childbirth with IMV was stated.
Obstetrics then uncharacteristically intervenes in podiatry and birth pangs arrive to realign the feet, with the interference articulated by Rice as follows: "What we're seeing here, in a sense, is the growing -- the birth pangs of a new Middle East and whatever we do we have to be certain that we're pushing forward to the new Middle East not going back to the old one."
The cast of characters in Rice's principal metaphor can be determined if we assume that birth pangs generally occur in the mother, after which it becomes clear that:
Birth pangs can sometimes occur in the form of aerial bombardments.
Nor has the Pang brothers' film - which plods in the numerous action sequences and relies on directorial brio to compensate for paltry character development and linear plotting - got the same flaws which afflicted the 1999 version.
Like the original, the new Bangkok Dangerous draws heavily on the Pang brothers' visual flourishes, underpinned by sterling work from cinematographer Decha Simantra.
The key thing, according to the Gospel, is simply to keep one's faith through the chaos even though the devout will, like the contemporary United States of America, "be hated by all nations." This is fine if you foresee eternal paradise at the end of the road, but those of us not expecting the imminent end of the world would probably prefer fewer pangs and more stability.
Those of us who live in the midst of the birth pangs have much to look forward to and much work to do.
Directed, written by Danny Pang. Camera (color), Witcha Intranoi; editors, Danny Pang, Curran Pang; music, Payont Permsith; production designer, Khunanun Srisuwan; sound (Dolby Digital), Yuttana Thusawut; stunt coordinator, Nati Panmanee; visual effects, Oriental Post.
A visually pumped-up youth pie centered on two no-hopers with "Nothing to Lose," Danny Pang's first solo feature sans brother Oxide is tailored to young Southeast Asian auds who'll get a charge out of its blackly comic nihilism.