panendoscopy


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panendoscopy

(pan-en-dos'kŏ-pē),
Examination, usually with the patient under general anesthesia, of the pharynx, larynx, upper trachea, and esophagus with rigid and flexible endoscopes.
See also: endoscopy.
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20) Surgical intervention should be carried out as a direct continuation of panendoscopy of the pharynx, esophagus, larynx, and trachea.
Suggested management for each type of injury Type Management 1 Observation, humidification, antibiotics, steroids, respiratory therapy 2 Tracheotomy/intubation, panendoscopy, antibiotics, steroids 3 Panendoscopy, open surgical repair with or without stenting and with or without tracheotomy or tracheostomy 4 Panendoscopy, open surgical repair with stenting, with or without tracheotomy or tracheostomy 5 Tracheotomy/intubation, panendoscopy, reconstruction, restoration, or resection with end-to-end anastomosis with or without stenting (a long-term tube may serve as a stent) Source: Modified from data included in references 1, 2, and 3.
2) Therefore, patients with primary index tumors often undergo panendoscopy for the purposes of searching for and staging synchronous primary head and neck tumors.
At some centers, surgeons still perform panendoscopy as a routine part of the diagnostic work-up, even though the use of triple-endoscopy is controversial because the incidence of synchronous primary head and neck tumors reported in literature varies widely (3 to 13%).
5)--who had head and neck malignancies and who underwent panendoscopy as part of their diagnostic work-up in the Division of Otorhinolaryngology at the United Christian Hospital in Hong Kong between Jan.
The most common indication for panendoscopy was laryngeal carcinoma, which was present in 18 of the 30 patients (table 1).
Panendoscopy is an important diagnostic tool for evaluating patients for head and neck malignancies.
The purpose of the study described in this article was to evaluate the use of flexible esophagoscopy as part of routine panendoscopy in the academic otolaryngology setting.
We determined the adequacy of each examination by reviewing the charts and operative reports of patients who had undergone flexible esophagoscopy as part of panendoscopy for the diagnostic evaluation of upper aerodigestive tract malignancies.
There were no immediate or long-term complications associated with the flexible esophagoscopy component of the panendoscopy.