pancreatic

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pancreatic

 [pan″kre-at´ik]
pertaining to the pancreas.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pan·cre·at·ic

(pan'rē-at'ik),
Relating to the pancreas.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pancreatic

adjective Pertaining or referring to the pancreas.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pan·cre·at·ic

(pan'krē-at'ik)
Relating to the pancreas.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitamin A inhibits pancreatic stellate cell activation: implications for treatment of pancreatic fibrosis. Gut, 55(1):79-89, 2006.
Apte, "Vitamin A inhibits pancreatic stellate cell activation: implications fortreatment of pancreatic fibrosis," Gut, vol.
Bell Jr., "Pancreatic stellate cell activation and MMP production in experimental pancreatic fibrosis," Journal of Surgical Research, vol.
One of the key features in the microscopic examination of alcoholic CP is pancreatic fibrosis. Decisive advances in our understanding of pancreatic fibrosis have been made by the ability to isolate and culture PSCs (Apte et al.
Vollmar, "Diabetes increases pancreatic fibrosis during chronic inflammation," Experimental Biology and Medicine.
Diffuse pancreatic fibrosis: an uncommon feature of multifocal idiopathic fibrosclerosis.
The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is long-term alcohol abuse.[1] According to our previous study,[2] pancreatic fibrosis associated with alcohol abuse can show any fibrosis pattern according to Martin's 3 main patterns of pancreatic fibroatrophic states[3]: (1) predominantly intralobular sclerosis, which is always homogenous and diffuse; (2) predominantly perilobular sclerosis, with a cirrhosis-like aspect but which is irregular and sometimes patchy; and (3) mixed intralobular and perilobular sclerosis, often homogenously distributed in the gland.