palynology

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Related to palynologists: Paleopalynology

palynology

(păl″ĭ-nŏl′-ŏ-jē) [Gr. palumein, to sprinkle, + logos, word, reason]
The study of pollens, spores, or microscopic segments of organisms present in sediments.

palynology

the study of pollen including pollen analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
We hope this review might raise awareness of orbicules and inspire a new generation of molecular biologists, palynologists, and systematists alike to explore the potential of orbicules in their own field of research.
Dallas: American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists.
First, while palynologists such as Yasuda (1989) indicate the possibility of cooling trends towards the end of the Middle Jomon, the precise timing of this event is yet to be identified.
Instead, citing the work of palynologists publishing in the 1980s and 1990s he claims that vegetation changes indicate the presence of humans approximately 150,000 years ago.
In scientific associations Romans held memberships in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists, the American Forestry Association, the American Institute of Biological Sciences, the Arizona Academy of Science, the Botanical Society of America, the International Organization of Paleobotany, the International Society of Plant Morphologists, the Michigan Botanical Club, the Paleontological Association, the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society, and the Torrey Botanical Club.
Dallas, Texas, American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Foundation: 191-203.
Editors), Palynology: Principles and Applications, American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Foundation, v.
Palynological studies are most numerous, and pollen sites are densest in Minnesota (where both palynologists and sites are abundant, and where sediment is rich in pollen and easy to extract), with fewer in Wisconsin and very few in Iowa and Illinois (fewer sites and palynologists, sparser pollen and more difficult extraction) (see Webb et al.
But palynologists, who study pollen and spores, say the plant grains are nothing to sneeze at.
Examining these questions are paleontology'sallied disciplines: sedimentologists study fossil ripple marks, paleobotanists fossil plants, palynologists fossil pollen.
He is the past president of the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists, the past president of the Society for Organic Petrology, and is a member and fellow of the Geological Society of America and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.