palpitate


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palpitate

[pal′pitāt]
Etymology: L, palpitare, to flutter
to pulsate rapidly, as in the unusually fast beating of the heart under various conditions of stress and in certain heart problems.

pal·pi·tate

(pal'pi-tāt)
1. To beat with excessive rapidity; throb, as in the rapid beating of the heart during periods of stress or specified heart conditions.
2. To move with a slight tremulous motion; tremble, shake, or quiver.
[L. palpito, to pulsate]

palpitate

(păl′pĭ-tāt) [L. palpitatus, throbbing]
1. To cause to throb.
2. To throb or beat intensely or rapidly, usually said of the heart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each 28ft high tower has a hollow base that can be used for storage, signage or seating and each is topped with synthetic canvas that gently palpitates with light, bathing the park in a warm glow after dark.
Additionally, the new AS-MAX features a pulsating fan that gently palpitates the shrimp in the airstream to aid waste removal.
Sharing that she palpitates when anticipating the noise, the actress-reality show judge said it was the last straw when the loud hammering disturbed her sleep.
Moreover, that same awe of God's manifestations in nature resurges in poems dedicated to "Las rocas" and the millenarian immanence that palpitates inside them, like a "maternal lava," and quietly listens and understands eternity.
At night, the translucent membrane palpitates with light in a remarkable installation conceived by lighting designer Uwe Belzer.
At night, light palpitates gently through the delicate glass skin, dematerializing the building mass and hinting at the activities inside.
Feliciano examines his views on class and religion; his apprenticeship in Paris (he studied at the Sorbonne with the help of a Rockefeller Fellowship); his interest in music and architecture; his fascination with a handful of artists, renaissance and existential, including Camus, Sartre, Unamuno, Antonin Artaud (whose theater of cruelty palpitates in Solorzano's stage), Calderon de la Barca, and Michel de Ghelderode; and his compulsion to articulate his mitopoesis around pre-Columbian rituals and medieval autos sacramentales.