palpitate


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palpitate

[pal′pitāt]
Etymology: L, palpitare, to flutter
to pulsate rapidly, as in the unusually fast beating of the heart under various conditions of stress and in certain heart problems.

pal·pi·tate

(pal'pi-tāt)
1. To beat with excessive rapidity; throb, as in the rapid beating of the heart during periods of stress or specified heart conditions.
2. To move with a slight tremulous motion; tremble, shake, or quiver.
[L. palpito, to pulsate]

palpitate

(păl′pĭ-tāt) [L. palpitatus, throbbing]
1. To cause to throb.
2. To throb or beat intensely or rapidly, usually said of the heart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ar Adain y Gwynt (On the Wings of the Wind) promises to cause viewers' hearts to palpitate and their stomachs to churn as John, one of the world's most extreme paragliders, and Alun take to the skies.
His heart would palpitate and beads of sweat would form on his forehead as he started to dial the phone number.
But even when signals of mobile services such as the BSNL palpitate or die here, PKUF1 and PK11 -- two Pakistani mobile service providers -- are very much active.
nor [watch] along the fiery bay / The shine of summer darkness palpitate and play" (2.
Lovely to be completely unstressed, I think, as I palpitate, forget to eat and tank round the city.
The birth attendant would palpitate a pregnant belly, as is the practice usually adopted by the women, most of them elderly, who traditionally assist labor in this region - but their training did not equip them to draw important conclusions.
Pulses start to race and the heart starts to palpitate as the body prepares for ultimate pleasure.
In January 1974, the medical students at Cardiff were revolting (no change there then, boom boom) because they had to inject live dogs with various drugs, in order to test the hounds' reaction (quiver, palpitate, froth, convulse, die - that's generally how it went).