palpable

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palpable

 [pal´pah-b'l]
perceptible by touch.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl),
1. Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.
2. Evident; plain.
[see palpation]

palpable

(păl′pə-bəl)
n.
Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.

palpable

(păl′pə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Capable of being handled, touched, or felt; tangible: "Anger rushed out in a palpable wave through his arms and legs" (Herman Wouk).
b. Medicine Capable of being felt by palpating: a palpable tumor.
2. Easily perceived; obvious: "There was a palpable sense of expectation in the court" (Nelson DeMille).

pal′pa·bil′i·ty n.
pal′pa·bly adv.

palpable

Physical exam adjective Referring to that which can be felt. Cf Nonpalpable.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl)
1. Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.
2. Evident; plain.
See: palpation

palpable

Able to be felt.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl)
1. Perceptible to touch.
2. Evident; plain.
References in periodicals archive ?
That being the case, shouldn't those very same Liverpool supporters, when their team is struggling (which was palpably obvious on Saturday) re-double their efforts to lift the players in such circumstances?
Likely to have come on for that outing and having already completed the Grand National - where he palpably failed to stay - he can get his head in front where it matters.
Well, the Chelsea man's spot-kick miss on Wednesday was palpably worse (down to poor technique rather than a treacherous surface) and his tears far more copious, yet for the most part he received sympathetic notices from those same correspondents and his iron-man credentials remain intact.
Hotel occupancy rates were 90%, up from 89% last year The price that rooms are commanding rose palpably, averaging $306, or 15% more than average rates last June.
His narration makes the book seem like watching a play, a somewhat predictable thriller with fleshed-out characters and a palpably seedy backdrop.
Palpably, this source of mutuality and co-operation was a centre in their lives.
"They are palpably dangerous to health." In other words, when someone complains of being knocked out after cleaning house, it's likely more than just a turn of phrase.
Now the fact that historically "the church" has referred more palpably to an authority to be reckoned with than to a sustaining community of faith went a long way to making Max Weber's thesis palatable: the university providing its own context as a substitute for church as it functioned in the medieval centers of learning.
Looking around, we would probably sense the mounting anticipation, the palpably felt excitement in the air.
Not only because they represent work that is palpably finer, but because they exuded confidence, wit and made cultural references that were far from local, without any trace of self-consciousness.
During the quintet, even people working in the basement could palpably feel that something important was happening on stage and walked upstairs to stand in the wings.