palmate

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Related to palmately: pinnately

palmate

/pal·mate/ (pahl´māt) having a shape resembling that of a hand with the fingers spread.

palmate

(păl′māt′, päl′-, pä′māt′) also

palmated

(-mā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Having a shape similar to that of a hand with the fingers extended: palmate antlers; palmate coral.
2. Botany Having three or more veins, leaflets, or lobes radiating from one point; digitate: a palmate leaf.
3. Zoology Having webbing that connects the three front toes, as the feet of many waterbirds.

pal′mate′ly adv.
Palmateclick for a larger image
Fig. 244 Palmate . A palmate leaf.

palmate

(of a leaf) having at least three leaflets joined to the PETIOLE at the same place.
References in periodicals archive ?
The phase change of the apical meristem of the short shoots from vegetative to reproductive stands against Ahrendt's (1961) interpretation that each foliose leaf in these shoots represents a leaflet of a palmately compound leaf.
5B); apical cells 5-12, palmately arranged or in a nodding cluster (Fig.
Palmately lobed Proteaceae leaf fossils from the Middle Eocene of South Australia.
Leaves alternate to rarely opposite, rosulate, clustered at the branch apices to clustered in the axils of the old leaves; petiolate, sessile to sheathing at the base; blades entire, lyrate, pinnatisect to pinnately compound, unarmed to spiny, pinnately, palmately to three-veined, rarely parallel-veined, glabrous to pubescent.
Leaves clustered on brachyblasts; subsessile; blades ovate-elliptic, palmately, pinnately to three-veined, margin entire, slightly pubescent on both surfaces.
Leaves glabrous to pubescent; basal leaves rosulate; petiolate, sessile to clasping; blades linear, lanceolate, ovate to orbicular, palmately to pinnately veined, margin entire, lyrate to pinnatisect; upper leaves alternate, reduced; clasping.
Referring to the above papers, Foster (1950) has expressed the view : "But the 'typical' venation of the leaves of angiosperms is 'closed' and it seems highly doubtful to the writer that the 'forked' veins which frequently occur in pinnately and palmately veined leaves, should be interpreted as 'traces of ancient dichotomies'".
applicable only to palmately veined leaves, or characters describing