pallid


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Related to pallid: pallid bat, wintriness, soliloquizing

pal·lid

(pal'id)
Pale, faint, or deficient in color.
[L. pallidus, pale]

pallid

(păl′ĭd) [L. pallidus, pale]
Lacking color, pale, wan.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pallid Swifts nest in the Mediterranean and there hasn't yet been a sighting in North Wales.
"Data gathered through this study will assist in the preservation of the pallid sturgeon and may hopefully lead to its down listing," Commissioner Burman said.
Based on the colour change demonstrated by the child during the spell, Breath holding spells were classified as cyanotic, pallid and mixed.
The latest bit of French insanity that insists on the wearing of bikinis on the beach will not only bar Muslim ladies and nuns, but also the old, the fat, the self-conscious and the pallid from beaches, leaving them only to the young, slim and bronzed.
Mia Wasikowska gives a pallid performance as Alice.
Mia Wasikowska is pallid as Alice, who must risk destroying Wonderland by going back in time to save Mad Hatter Johnny Depp and his family.
YOUR correspondent Alan Praill ('Awful clash of colours', April 5) asks the valid question of why Newcastle United played in a pallid blue and white strip against the yellow and green of Norwich.
Critique: "Naked Slaughter" by Nigel Lampard is a noir mystery exposing the sinister side of humanity and the wavering flame of love's pallid candle.
Your Poem My Town I stand on the crown of a hill over the town The town I have loved since my youth Yet even the name of this summit has changed Becoming Everton: mangled by accent uncouth Hacked, misquoted, and slowly by degree dissolving To a meaningless worm of a colourless word Pallid, insipid, lifeless when compared With the simple description, 'Over Town' Where any man who wished to might look down And view the crowded streets, where traders set their stalls Fresh fruit from a farm in Formby, silk from Cathay, smooth wines from Gaul Haggle and barter: a young child's sudden laughter surely all life is here!
Although derived from a book by a real-life heart surgeon, the series plays like a rather pallid "Grey's Anatomy" knockoff, featuring another doctor who cares desperately about her patients, runs roughshod over subordinates and bosses alike, and walks and talks very, very fast.
The team witnessed a phenomenon termed "pallid bands" in a large proportion of fledgling Grasshopper Sparrows and found spikes in the chemical signatures of pallid bands, which led to abnormalities in the new feathers.