palliative treatment


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treatment

 [trēt´ment]
1. the management and care of a patient; see also care.
2. the combating of a disease or disorder; called also therapy.
Schematic of the treatment planning process using occupational therapy as an example. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.
active treatment treatment directed immediately to the cure of the disease or injury.
causal treatment treatment directed against the cause of a disease.
conservative treatment treatment designed to avoid radical medical therapeutic measures or operative procedures.
empiric treatment treatment by means that experience has proved to be beneficial.
expectant treatment treatment directed toward relief of untoward symptoms, leaving the cure of the disease to natural forces.
extraordinary treatment a type of treatment that is usually highly invasive and might be considered burdensome to the patient; the effort to decide what is extraordinary raises numerous ethical questions.
fever treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient with hyperpyrexia caused by nonenvironmental factors. See also fever.
heat exposure treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient overcome by heat due to excessive environmental heat exposure. See also heat stroke.
hypothermia treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as rewarming and surveillance of a patient whose core body temperature is below 35°C. See also hypothermia.
Kenny treatment a treatment formerly used for poliomyelitis, consisting of wrapping of the back and limbs in hot cloths, followed, after pain has subsided, by passive exercise and instruction of the patient in exercise of the muscles. It was named for Sister Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian nurse known for her care of polio patients during the first half of the 20th century.
neurodevelopmental treatment Bobath method.
palliative treatment supportive care.
preventive treatment prophylaxis.
t's and procedures in the omaha system, a term used at the first level of the intervention scheme defined as technical nursing activities directed toward preventing signs and symptoms, identifying risk factors and early signs and symptoms, and decreasing or alleviating signs and symptoms.
treatment and/or procedure a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action prescribed to cure, relieve, control, or prevent a client problem.
prophylactic treatment prophylaxis.
rape-trauma treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of emotional and physical support immediately following a reported rape.
rational treatment that based upon knowledge of disease and the action of the remedies given.
refusal of treatment see under refusal.
root canal treatment root canal therapy.
specific treatment treatment particularly adapted to the special disease being treated.
substance use treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as supportive care of patient/family members with physical and psychosocial problems associated with the use of alcohol or drugs. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: alcohol withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of the patient experiencing sudden cessation of alcohol consumption. See also alcoholism.
substance use treatment: drug withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of a patient experiencing drug detoxification. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: overdose in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as monitoring, treatment, and emotional support of a patient who has ingested prescription or over-the-counter drugs beyond the therapeutic range. See also overdose.
supporting treatment (supportive treatment) supportive care.

pal·li·a·tive treat·ment

treatment to alleviate symptoms without curing the disease.
Synonym(s): palliative care

pal·li·a·tive treat·ment

(pal'ē-ă-tiv trēt'mĕnt)
Therapy that alleviates symptoms but does not cure the disease.

palliative treatment

Treatment that relieves symptoms but does not cure their cause.

Palliative treatment

A type treatment that does not provide a cure, but eases the symptoms.
Mentioned in: Laparoscopy

pal·li·a·tive treat·ment

(pal'ē-ă-tiv trēt'mĕnt)
Treatment to alleviate symptoms without curing the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as palliative treatment for malignant colorectal obstruction: A single-center study from Japan.
The evaluation of esophageal stenting complications in palliative treatment of dysphagia related to esophageal cancer.
158 patients were under palliative treatments, of them 128 presented high psychological distress (HADS>13) and 68 ( HADS>20).
In our case we gave precaution from trauma, palliative treatment and nutritional support given with autologous skin grafts on non-healing lesions.
Further larger studies are needed to confirm the role of this kind of SEMS as bridge to surgery or palliative treatment evaluating also the clinical efficacy and/or adverse events associating chemotherapy treatment.
Bruno et al., "Efficacy and safety of the new WallFlex enteral stent in palliative treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (DUOFLEX study): a prospective multicenter study," Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol.
It is the oldest documented case of palliative treatment of dental disease done with this tool.
"Although studies with a control group are missing, the improvement in symptoms should push the use of cannabis in the practice of oncology palliative treatment," the report concluded.
Regard "must also be had to the fact that this application was only brought after E and her family and carers had embarked a long way down the course of palliative treatment".
TPC was defined as any single-agent chemotherapy, hormonal treatment or biologic therapy approved for the treatment of cancer; or palliative treatment or radiotherapy administered according to local practice.
In fact, an increasing amount of research suggests that starting palliative treatment in the emergency department or intensive care unit can lead to significant improvements in care.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave its blessing to the technology the following year, endorsing the company's 510(k) application for adjunctive use in the palliative treatment of postoperative pain and edema in superficial soft tissue.