palliative surgery


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palliative surgery

An operation performed on an incurable CA, which is justified to ↓ severity of Sx and improve the quality of life, relieve pain–cordectomy, hemorrhage–cystectomy for bleeding urinary bladder, obstruction–colostomy or gastroenterostomy, or infection–amputation of a necrotic and malodorous tumor-ridden breast or extremity. See 'Heroic' surgery, Mutilating surgery.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

palliative surgery

Surgery to relieve symptoms or improve quality of life, usually in patients with incurable illness.
See also: surgery
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Schwarze, "Palliative surgery for malignant bowel obstruction from carcinomatosis: a systematic review," JAMA Surgery, vol.
Palliative surgery has been used by some authors to denote surgical interventions which in themselves have no bearing to the life of the patient but offer the last possible intervention for an improved outcome, with a number reporting durable symptom relief and improved quality of life following surgical palliation [16,17].
Millat, "Palliative surgery of pancreatic adenocarcinoma," Gastroenterologie Clinique et Biologique, vol.
Little Hayley had palliative palliative surgery at the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast weeks after she was born but was then flown to Birmingham for corrective heart surgery in October 2009.
The court heard that Hayley had palliative surgery at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast weeks after she was born.
If possible, however, the patients with this carcinoma are usually treated by either radical or palliative surgery. In general, conservative treatments are thought to be unfavourable to the tumor (4).
Except for larger hospices, most are unable to bear the cost burden of palliative radiation or palliative surgery. Palliative home care programs can provide selected hospice services while the patient receives life-sustaining treatment.
Individuals aged 18 years and older, undergoing curative or palliative surgery for primary malignant neoplasias of the digestive system from August 1, 2007 to July 31, 2008, were enrolled in the study.
Responders continued on chemotherapy for 10 more weeks before resection, whereas nonresponders stopped chemotherapy and had palliative surgery based on prior studies indicating that further chemotherapy would be of little benefit.
Among the 181 patients, 165 patients had curative resection; the remaining 16 had stage IV disease, and underwent palliative surgery and were subsequently excluded from analysis.