palliative sedation


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palliative sedation

The administration of sedative and hypnotic drugs to dying patients to induce coma and alleviate pain and suffering. It is a technique used in end-of-life care when other measures to achieve comfort for the dying patient have failed. Medications such as barbiturates and opiates are used to tranquilize the patient. The intent is not to hasten death, although ultimately, palliative sedation induces a coma from which the patient will not awaken.
See also: sedation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(57) Palliative Sedation: The Ethical Controversy, MEDSCAPE, https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/499472 (last visited Apr.
(11.) Royal Dutch Medical Association Committee on National Guideline for Palliative Sedation. Guideline for Palliative Sedation 2009.
Practices such as palliative sedation, discontinuing life-sustaining medical care, and providing palliative support to a patient who chooses to stop eating and drinking could all be characterized as intending to end life.
Some people oppose palliative sedation because it can interfere with the opportunity for a person to communicate with family members and friends or to finish psychological or spiritual work as his or her life ends.
In the article, the term "palliative sedation to unconsciousness," or PSU, implies the concerning assumption that sedation will knowingly be to unconsciousness in the palliative case under consideration.
The practice of sedating patients with intractable pain into unconsciousness and withholding food and water until death inevitably ensues is known as terminal or palliative sedation and was endorsed as an acceptable option, indeed one seen as negating the need for assisted suicide, by the AMA and other amici in the Quill and Glucksberg cases.
Byock tells his patients that there always is the option of palliative sedation if no other options are working and pain is unbearable.
These factors beset the ethics of what is sometimes called "terminal sedation" or "palliative sedation." (85) When pain and discomfort are extreme and persistent, unconsciousness is induced as a last resort, the relative immediacy of death is accepted, and ANH are typically not administered.
This has also been called "total sedation" and "palliative sedation." Such interventions are actively promulgated by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).