palliative


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

palliative

 [pal´e-ah-tiv]
1. giving relief but not curing.
2. a drug with this effect.

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv),
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.

palliative

/pal·li·a·tive/ (pal´e-a″tiv) affording relief; also, a drug that so acts.

palliative

(păl′ē-ā′tĭv, -ē-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending or serving to palliate.
2. Alleviating the symptoms of a disease or disorder, especially one that is terminal, when a cure is not available.
n.
One that palliates, especially a palliative drug or medicine.

pal′li·a′tive·ly adv.

palliative

adjective Referring to treatment to relieve or ameliorate the symptoms of a painful condition, usually understood to mean of terminal cancer, especially the deep-seated bone pain of metastatic breast cancer.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PAY lee uh tive.
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PAL ee uh tive.

palliative

Radiation oncology adjective Referring to treatment to relieve Sx of a disease but not to cure it, especially alleviating pain

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.

Palliative

Referring to any type of treatment that is given to relieve the symptoms of a disease rather than to cure it.

palliation

; palliative therapies that reduce symptom severity, but do not cure

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of pain or discomfort.

palliative (pal´ēətiv),

n an alleviating measure.

palliative

affording relief; also, a drug that so acts.
References in periodicals archive ?
While quoting World Health Organisation (WHO) as saying that 40million people need palliative care globally, she said at least 500,000 of these people live in Nigeria.
However, palliative care is different from hospice care in that the latter begins after treatment of cancer is stopped and it is clear that the person may not survive the illness.
Palliative care services in SA started in the non-governmental sector in the 1980s.
The government says the contract to care for people needing palliative care in the last three months of life, is expected to be worth $80 million over seven years.
Wellington Regional Hospital palliative care nurse practitioner Alison Rowe said the demand for specialist palliative care training had been "overwhelming".
The eligible applicants can gain a better understanding of palliative care, how to recognise the chronically or seriously ill people who need it, and how to provide palliative care services.
These recommendations support the conclusion of the Call for Action and outline the steps necessary to achieve quality primary palliative nursing, regardless of setting.
The plan included building a health system prioritizing pain relief and palliative care alongside prevention and control efforts7.
Chronic Illness--Optimizing Advanced Complex Illness Support (OACIS) is a program in Pennsylvania that provides home-based palliative care to older Americans with advanced illness.
The nationwide data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan (http://data.
Ultimately, we must make the case for allocating monies to palliative care that show population benefit.
Palliative care is a relatively new specialty that evolved during the last five decades.