palliative


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palliative

 [pal´e-ah-tiv]
1. giving relief but not curing.
2. a drug with this effect.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv),
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

palliative

(păl′ē-ā′tĭv, -ē-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending or serving to palliate.
2. Alleviating the symptoms of a disease or disorder, especially one that is terminal, when a cure is not available.
n.
One that palliates, especially a palliative drug or medicine.

pal′li·a′tive·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

palliative

adjective Referring to treatment to relieve or ameliorate the symptoms of a painful condition, usually understood to mean of terminal cancer, especially the deep-seated bone pain of metastatic breast cancer.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PAY lee uh tive.
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PAL ee uh tive.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

palliative

Radiation oncology adjective Referring to treatment to relieve Sx of a disease but not to cure it, especially alleviating pain
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Palliative

Referring to any type of treatment that is given to relieve the symptoms of a disease rather than to cure it.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of pain or discomfort.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The biggest challenge is the need for palliative programmes to integrate social workers, nurses and psychologists into the team.
* Familiarizing nurses working in oncologic settings with palliative care principles.
Pediatric palliative transport allows dying children final comfort in the form of their home.
Palliative care can be very helpful in addressing quality of life for people who have a chronic illness.
Hospice and palliative care physicians, nurses, and social workers can assist patients and families with advance directives, Five Wishes, and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatments (POLSTs).
The survey provides a snapshot of our members and demonstrates that many are already providing care further upstream from hospice," said NHPCO Vice President of Palliative and Serious Illness Care Lori Bishop.
Palliative care is given by a group of doctors, specialists, medical caretakers, and different masters, who cooperate with a patient's different specialists to give an additional layer of help.
'In 2013, the Ministry of Health asked the Oman Cancer Association to be the focal point for training in palliative care programme.
Azza Ibrahim Hassan, Senior Consultant, Oncology at NCCCR and Director of the Supportive and Palliative Care Program said coping with advanced illness is stressful for patients and their families.
A major seminar on palliative care in Oman will take place next week at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, participated by senior healthcare officials and experts.