palinopsia


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palinopsia

 [pal″in-op´se-ah]
visual perseveration; the pathologic continuance or recurrence of a visual sensation after the stimulus is gone.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·li·nop·si·a

(pa-li-nop'sē-ă),
Persistence or recurrence of a visual image after removal of the stimulus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pa·li·nop·si·a

(pal'i-nop'sē-ă)
Abnormal recurring visual hallucinations.
[G. palin, again, + opsis, vision]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

palinopsia

The persistent perception of a visual image for some time after the direction of gaze has been moved so that the original image is superimposed on another. Multiple identical images (polyopia) may be perceived. The cause of this rare symptom remains uncertain but some cases are epileptic phenomena affecting the non-dominant occipito-temporal cortex.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

palinopsia 

Visual persistence of the image of an object in the absence of its original stimulus. There is usually a latent period, which may amount to several minutes between the visual stimulation and the corresponding mental image. The latter typically disappears within seconds, although it may persist in some cases for several minutes. The subsequent mental image is quite faithful to the original stimulus. It is usually associated with a lesion in the parieto-occipital or temporal-occipital areas as a result of a cerebral infarction, epilepsy, tumour, or brain injury. Syn. visual perseveration.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

pa·li·nop·si·a

(pal'i-nop'sē-ă)
Abnormal recurring visual hallucinations.
[G. palin, again, + opsis, vision]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lee, "Palinopsia revamped: a systematic review of the literature," Survey of Ophthalmology, vol.
The mechanism of palinopsia is still unclear whether it is an epileptic phenomenon or a release phenomenon.
We consider this to be unlikely, however, because she had no prior LSD use, a history of well-formed visual hallucinations not characteristic of HPPD, and no other characteristic symptoms of HPPD (palinopsia, afterimages, illusory movement, etc.).
* Palinopsia: imagen recurrente despues de ser removida (palin=otra vez; opsia=vision) (19,31).