paleopathology


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paleopathology

 [pa″le-o-pah-thol´ŏ-je]
study of disease in bodies that have been preserved from ancient times.

pa·le·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(pā'lē-ō-pa-thol'ŏ-jē),
The science of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
[paleo- + pathology]

pa·le·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(pā'lē-ō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1998): The Cambridge encyclopedia of human paleopathology. Cambridge.
"You begin to see features that relate to paleopathology, diseases that may have been suffered by the individual, also mummification style and patterns -- how they may change through time," said Dr.
With the advantage of a large sample dating to a limited time period, 578 shaft tomb burials from the Early Bronze Age IA (3300-3200 B.C.) with males and females of all ages represented, the authors and contributors reconstruct the ancient population through discussions of paleodemography and paleopathology.
Reports of those investigations clearly indicate that atherosclerosis has been a common condition throughout antiquity, and that the histopathology of disease is independent of "race, diet, and the stresses of survival" with the arterial lesions in mummified remains being "no different from those we see today." (10) Other paleopathology studies of preserved human remains include those of Chinese and Alaskan Inuit ancestry, all of which showed evidence of atheromatous plaques and other indications of CVD.
The report of this exhumation and research, presented in 2002 to the Paleopathology Association by Drs Cook and Powell stated, "This adult male skeleton showed extensive new bone formation on the medial and lateral surfaces of the right ilium.
Towards establishing a modern baseline for paleopathology: Trace-producing parasites in a bivalve host.