palaeobotany

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palaeobotany

the study of fossils plants, particularly fossils of pollen grain, which are used in reconstructing past environments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The members -- including a sedimentologist, geologist, paleobotanist, paleoecologist and additional paleontologists including an expert on therizinosaurs -- determined that this particular area of Denali was a wet, marsh-like environment and that one fossil in particular looked like a water lily, which supported the theory that there were ponds and standing water nearby.
What he unearths is a whole world of forgotten grapes, each with distinctive tastes and aromas, as well as the archaeologists, geneticists, chemists, (and even a paleobotanist) who are deciphering wine down to molecules of flavor.
For example, to evaluate a molecular-dating study of legumes, you could select a paleobotanist to evaluate the authors' choice of fossil calibrations and a computational biologist to evaluate the authors' molecular-dating methods.
Laura Dern, 48, played paleobotanist Dr Ellie Sattler, who escaped the island alive.
Climate change is the main topic of this year's BGT: During the first scientific presentation, in January at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherry Earth Observatory, students toured the labs of a paleobotanist and cored a tree with a dendrochronologist.
Selena Smith, a paleobotanist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, uses X-ray imaging to explore the evolutionary history of banana and ginger plants from the order Zingiberales through their fossilized seeds.
One is a paleobotanist and another is the granddaughter of the park's inventor.
"Because they were petrified, and in many cases replaced with silica, much of their internal anatomy was fossilized, sometimes at a near cellular level," says Kirk Johnson, a paleobotanist and director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.
"We have big organisms living on land a lot further back than we thought before," Discovery News quoted study author Gregory Retallack, a geologist and paleobotanist at the University of Oregon, as saying.
Hester Holland's 1925 story "Dorner Cordaianthus," a sort of Jurassic Park-narrative with plants, evokes a specifically Darwinian unease, as the mad paleobotanist believes that "a theory that the missing link between human beings and the rest of the living world would eventually be established through plants" (Cassaba 62).