paleopathology

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paleopathology

 [pa″le-o-pah-thol´ŏ-je]
study of disease in bodies that have been preserved from ancient times.

pa·le·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(pā'lē-ō-pa-thol'ŏ-jē),
The science of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
[paleo- + pathology]

paleopathology

/pa·leo·pa·thol·o·gy/ (-pah-thol´ah-je) study of disease in bodies which have been preserved from ancient times.

paleopathology

[-pathol′əjē]
the science of disease in ancient eras based on the condition of remains of mummies, skeletons, and other archeological findings.

pa·le·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(pā'lē-ō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.

paleopathology

study of disease in bodies that have been preserved from ancient times.
References in periodicals archive ?
Macroscopic analysis and data collection in palaeopathology
Radiography and allied techniques in the palaeopathology of skeletal remains
1995 Palaeopathology of Aboriginal Australians, Cambridge University Press.
Including an introductory look at the field, the papers report on such topics as animal palaeopathology in prehistoric and historic Ireland, pathological alteration of cattle skeletons as evidence for the drought exploitation of animals, identifying livestock diet from charred plant remains in a Neolithic settlement in Southern Turkmenistan, tracking long distance movement of sheep and goats of Bakhtiari nomads with intra-tooth variations of stable isotopes, and tuberculosis as a zoonotic disease in antiquity.
Specialists from South Australia, interstate and overseas were employed to address a range of research areas, including chronology (Pate et al 1998; Prescott et al 1983; Pretty 1986, 1988), mortuary practices (Pate 1984; Pretty 1977), demography (Prokopec 1979), population biology (Brown 1989; Pardoe 1995; Pietrusewsky 1984; Pretty et al 1998), palaeopathology (Pretty and Kricun 1989; Prokopec and Pretty 1991), dental anthropology (Smith et al 1988), forensic science (Pretty 1975), palaeodiet (Pate 2000), palaeoecology (Parker 1989; Paton 1983), palaeobotany (Boyd and Pretty 1989), soil chemistry (Pate et al 1989), and earth sciences (Firman 1984; Rogers 1990).