Binoculars

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Binoculars 

A set of two identical telescopes, one for each eye, which gives binocular vision of magnified distant objects. The images are erected using either an eyepiece of negative power, or prisms, or very occasionally, an additional lens system placed between objective and eyepiece. On binoculars, the magnification M and the diameter D of the objective or entrance pupil are shown as MD (e.g. 8 ✕ 30). Syn. field glasses; prism binoculars (for those which use prisms as erectors). See erector; galilean telescope; terrestrial telescope.
References in periodicals archive ?
A good pair of binoculars, whether on the range or in the field, are an item your customers may hesitate to purchase.
Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher gazing out at the world from behind a pair of binoculars, above, to an unamused Queen turning her nose up at the weather are among the exhibits.
A procedure that entails a detailed examination of the cervix (the neck of the womb) using a special magnifying instrument called a colposcope - it's a bit like a big pair of binoculars on a stand that can be moved around.
50 Special offer: Join now by direct debit and get two months free plus a pair of binoculars.
A pair of binoculars is recommended for Wild about Kielder events.
The piece of kit, which looks like a large pair of binoculars, will allow soldiers to pinpoint, watch and target enemies in all weathers, day and night, up to three miles away.
During the same period a pair of binoculars and five packets of Hamlet cigars were stolen from a Ford Mondeo after the rear windscreen was smashed.
The shrink (Alan Arkin) listens, but keeps looking out his window with a pair of binoculars.
Experts said it would have taken a good pair of binoculars at the very least to see the comet from Earth.
I purchased my first pair of binoculars from a drugstore-cum-sporting-goods establishment more years ago than I care to admit.
To the surprise of many astronomers, the glow spied by the telescope was so bright that it could have been seen with a pair of binoculars.
He once dispatched ace foreign correspondent William Shirer to fetch a pair of binoculars that he had left in a barn in France nine years earlier.