painkiller


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

painkiller

(pān′kĭl′ər)
n.
An agent, such as an analgesic drug, that relieves pain.

pain′kill′ing adj.

painkiller

, pain killer (pān′kil″ĕr)
A colloquial term for a medication or a procedure that decreases a patient's discomfort caused by pain or alleviates hurtful or unpleasant sensations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Painkillers were a major breakthrough in modern medicine - but must be treated with caution.
Painkillers' effects on germ cells are likely caused by their actions on molecules called prostaglandins, which have key functions in the ovaries and testes, the researchers found.
In her report, the GP said: "I prescribed him Co-codamol and we had a discussion because he was concerned about the amount of painkillers he was already taking."
A majority of respondents said their providers discussed the possibility of addiction or dependency, though 61 percent said there was no planning for tapering off use of painkillers. Fifty-seven percent said painkillers have improved their quality of life, while 16 percent said the drugs have worsened quality of life.
WASHINGTON -- Health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid painkillers in 2012--many more in some states than in others--according to a report released last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
* Women are more likely to have chronic pain, be prescribed prescription painkillers, be given higher doses, and use them for longer time periods than men.
But Shumlin did issue emergency rules making it harder for physicians to prescribe the most powerful painkillers.
But for day-of-period headaches, take a painkiller like Feminax Ultra containing naproxen (PS4.55 for nine), designed to limit prostaglandin release, which is thought to play a part in triggering migraines.
Painkillers can be used to ease symptoms and you can also do things at home to help your child such as placing a warm flannel against the infected ear.
"Some people use a painkiller to cure a toothache that they've had for a long time instead of going to a dentist to find out what causes the pain.
ALMOST two in five painkiller users need medication just so they can go to work, a healthcare charity has said.