pain scale


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pain scale

An assessment tool used to measure the intensity of a patient's discomfort.
See: Numerical Rating Scale; visual analog scale
See also: scale
References in periodicals archive ?
Behavioural observational pain scale Score Facial expression Verbalization Body position 0 Neutral/positive Normal conversation, Inactive, laying with facial expression, laugh, crow all extremities composed, calm relaxed, or sitting or walking 1 Negative facial Completely quiet Restless movements, expression, or sobbing in a shifting concerned and/or complaining, fashion, and/or but not because touching wound or of pain wound area 2 Negative facial Crying, screaming, Lying rigid and/or expression, grimace, and/or drawn up with distorted face complaining about arms and legs to pain the body The facial expression, verbalization, and body position were used for pain evaluation.
Pain was then recorded 2 hours later following the interventional drug and placebo tablets, using 3 internationally validated pain scales: Verbal pain intensity scale (VPIS), Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Numeric pain scale (NPS).
Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) is used for the pain assessment in neonates.
Results: The difference between the Visual Analog Scale and Face Pain Scale score with palatal injection and without palatal injection was not statistically significant (P.
Modified Behavioural Pain scale (40) Observed behavior Score (0-10) Facial expression Definite positive expression.
Additionally, there were 5.7% respondents with pain score of 5, 25.7% respondents with pain scale of 3, 51.4% respondents with pain scale of 2, and 17.1% respondents with pain score of 1.
The Wong-Baker Faces Pain scale (0-10) was used to assess the severity of pain experienced by the patient (Figure 2).
The results from the pain scale correlated with the results from the symptom reports.
Pain scores were similar in the acetaminophen and ibuprofen groups using the Objective Pain Scale (Viitanen et al., 2003).