packing

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packing

 [pak´ing]
1. the filling of a wound or cavity with gauze, sponge, or other material.
2. the material used for this purpose.

pack·ing

(pak'ing),
1. Filling a natural cavity, wound, or mold with some material.
2. The material so used.
3. The application of a pack.

packing

(păk′ĭng)
n.
a. The insertion of gauze or other material into a body cavity or wound for therapeutic purposes.
b. The material so used; a pack.

packing

ENT Nasal packing, see there.

pack·ing

(pak'ing)
1. Filling a natural cavity, a wound, or a mold with some material.
2. The material so used.
3. The application of a pack.

pack·ing

(pak'ing)
1. Filling a natural cavity, wound, or mold with some material.
2. The material so used.
3. The application of a pack.

Patient discussion about packing

Q. can i treat Arthritis with hot packs? will it make any different?

A. Actually ostheoarthritis is known to be aleviated with heat and so hot packs may help. Cold weather is known to aggravate arthritis. You should try a combination of physical therapy or minimal exercise with hot packs.

Q. Do you know the Aroma Therapy packs they sale over the mall? they say it's especially good for Arthritis, is it true ?

A. i'm a bit skeptic about "wonder treatments" you buy at the malls. i think that 99% of those things are there because desperate people will buy anything for a bit of peace of mind.

More discussions about packing
References in periodicals archive ?
Highly skilled suppliers/providers of random packing can boost the efficiency and performance of columns and the entire plant by providing cutting-edge designs for random packings.
Testing of the packings was carried out in the water-air system.
Many studies devoted to the biofiltration process discuss packings of natural materials such as sawdust, bark, wood chips, and others (Dorado et al.
But, researchers at NYU aimed to unravel the complex geometry of the packing of the sweets, reports Nature.
Some 400 years ago, Johannes Kepler speculated that the best scheme for packing three-dimensional spheres is the way that grocers have always done it.
Compression packings are made from many different materials and combinations of materials, each offering its own set of properties.
The process involves injecting a material compatible with any existing packing (not a curing compound--a misunderstanding that is at the root of many concerns), which may be considered as equivalent to the original packing material.
Meanwhile, a trio of mathematicians has come up with compelling numerical evidence--just shy of a proof--that the best sphere packings in dimensions 8 and 24.
As for other objects that can't be arranged to fill a space completely, such as cylinders and spheres, scientists have long pondered what their densest packings might be.