pacinian corpuscles


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Related to pacinian corpuscles: Meissner's Corpuscles, Ruffini corpuscles, Nociceptors

lam·el·lat·ed cor·pus·cles

small oval bodies in the skin of the fingers, in the mesentery, tendons, and elsewhere, formed of concentric layers of connective tissue with a soft core in which the axon of a nerve fiber runs, splitting up into a number of fibrils that terminate in bulbous enlargements; they are sensitive to pressure.

lam·el·lat·ed cor·pus·cles

(lam'ĕ-lāt'ĕd kōr'pŭs-ĕlz)
Small oval bodies in the skin of the fingers, in the mesentery, tendons, and elsewhere, formed of concentric layers of connective tissue with a soft core in which the axon of a nerve fiber runs, splitting up into a number of fibrils that terminate in bulbous enlargements; they are sensitive to pressure.
Synonym(s): corpuscula lamellosa [TA] , pacinian corpuscles.

Pacini,

Filippo, Italian anatomist, 1812-1883.
Pacini bodies
pacinian corpuscles - Synonym(s): Vater corpuscles
Vater-Pacini corpuscles - Synonym(s): Vater corpuscles
References in periodicals archive ?
In a glabrous skin, Pacinian corpuscles are deep-seated, whereas Meissner corpuscles are located nearer the surface.
Liu, Simulation Model of Pacinian Corpuscle for Haptic System Design, [M.S.
Other sensory receptors include free nerve endings, pacinian corpuscles, ruffini corpuscles, taste buds, hearing receptors, and smell receptors (Figure 4-7).
The potential benefits of this approach "include preservation of the Pacinian corpuscles to optimize sensation and preservation of the palmar fasciocutaneous attachment," Beth Costa, an occupational therapist at the center, said at the annual meeting of the American Burn Association.
Traditionally, these receptors are classified as muscle spindles (Ia and II fibers), Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) and joint afferents (GTOs, Ruffini endings, Pacinian corpuscles, and free nerve endings).
However, some of the nerve endings, called Pacinian corpuscles, are relatively deep - about 2 millimetres - under the skin, raising questions about how they could detect such subtle vibrations.
"Fingerprints might actually improve the sensitivity of perception by enhancing the skin vibrations at a frequency that matches the best frequency of these Pacinian corpuscles," Nature magazine quoted Debregeas as saying.