pacing

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pacing

 [pās´ing]
1. regulation of the rate of a physiologic process, such as by providing timed stimuli.
biventricular pacing that in which a lead is used to deliver current directly to the left ventricle, in addition to those used to deliver current to the right atrium and ventricle, so that the ventricles can be induced to pump in synchrony.
cardiac pacing regulation of cardiac rhythm (or the rate of contraction of the heart muscle) with electrical stimuli from a pulse generator or an artificial pacemaker.
diaphragm pacing (diaphragmatic pacing) electrophrenic respiration.
dual chamber pacing control of the heart rate by means of an artificial pacemaker that paces, senses, or does both in the atria and in the ventricles.
single chamber pacing control of the heart rate by an artificial pacemaker that paces and senses in either atria or ventricles, usually in the latter.
transthoracic pacing a system of single or dual chamber epicardial pacing in which the electrode wires are sewn directly onto the epicardium and brought out through an incision in the chest wall. See also epicardial pacemaker.
transvenous pacing a system of single or dual chamber endocardial pacing in which the electrode wires are passed through veins into the right atrium or ventricle. See also transvenous pacemaker.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pacing

Cardiology The timing of a physiologic event. See Burst pacing, Demand pacing, DDDR pacing, Dual-chamber pacing, Overdrive pacing, Physiologic pacing, Ramp pacing, Rate responsive pacing, Safety pacing, Transvenous pacing, Underdrive pacing.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pacing

Controlling the rate of an activity, especially the heart rate, usually by electronic devices, such as PACEMAKERS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in classic literature ?
There was no sleep for me, however, that night as I thought; and instead of attempting to solicit it, I employed myself in rapidly pacing the chamber, having first removed my boots, lest my mother should hear me.
The captain, or Wolf Larsen, as men called him, ceased pacing and gazed down at the dying man.
Scripps Co., that is precisely the case with respect to its first-quarter 2019 results, and its second-quarter pacings.
But, Local Media revenue on a pro-forma basis is pacing down in the low-single digits for Q2, and expenses are on the rise.
Pacing usually produces certain thoracic discomfort, mainly a burning chest sensation that most patients tolerate; nevertheless, minimizing of the pacing threshold is highly desirable and corresponding studies have been performed from the very early years of the development of this method [14].
Widely studied methods of reducing the stimulus current include finding the optimal position for the pacing electrode, finding suitable position of the patient [15, 16] and geometrical modification of the electrode.
The optimal position of the esophageal pacing electrode has been a subject of continuous discussions since this method was invented.
By gradually increasing the pacing current until stable capture of atrial pacing was confirmed by surface ECG, the pacing threshold of all 9 electrode positions was found.
A standard bipolar transesophageal catheter was inserted through the mouth and pacing was performed at interelectrode spacing of 40 mm and pulse duration of 10 ms.
It was electrically connected to the distal electrode of the esophageal catheter and the pacing threshold was determined again.
In clinical practice, transesophageal cardiac pacing usually causes patients discomfort or pain.
The lead set, exhibiting minimum pacing threshold, was determined (Fig.