pacifier


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pacifier

(pas'i-fī-ĕr),
An object, usually of hard plastic or some other material permitting sterilization, which is sucked by a nursing infant for solace.
[pacify, fr. M.E. pacifien, pacify, fr. O.Fr., fr. L. pacificare, to pacify, + -er]

pacifier

[pas′ifī′ər]
Etymology: L, pacificare, to bring peace
1 an agent that soothes or comforts.
2 a nipple-shaped object used by infants and children for sucking. The safest pacifiers are constructed in one piece, are large enough that only the nipple fits into the mouth, and have a handle that can be easily grasped. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends waiting to introduce a pacifier until a baby is 1 month old and breastfeeding is well established.

pacifier

(pas′ĭ-fī″ĕr)
A nipple, usually made of a synthetic material, , provided for infants to satisfy their need to suck.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of pacifier was the risk factor that was most associated with the non-consumption of exclusive or predominant breast milk and the intake of milk formulas and cow milk.
In the multiple analysis of the association between pacifier use and covariates, Poisson regression with robust variance was used to estimate prevalence ratios.
The present study analysed aspects related to the personal characteristics of the mothers and their infants over the 24-month follow-up period, the social support that they received throughout the first year of their infants' lives, and the pacifier sucking habit including offer attempts and reasons for pacifier introduction (all of which involve the influence of the mother-infant interaction).
When controlled for other factors that could affect the risk of developing allergy, such as allergy in the parents and delivery by Caesarean section, the beneficial effect of parental sucking on the pacifier remained.
When the child is old enough to travel, the pacifier helps create a place to sleep when her crib isn't handy.
Apparently, the sucking motion a baby makes with a pacifier can pull the developing upper back teeth inward toward the center of the mouth, so when they erupt through the gums, they sit inside the normally developed lower teeth instead of lining up with them.
which markets a variety of eco-friendly items, ranging from diapers to pacifiers.
2005) Early childhood pacifier use in relation to breastfeeding, SIDS, infection and dental malocclusion.
The longer the breastfeeding practice lasted, the lower the frequency of children with history of pacifier use (Graph 1).
A new, soft and broad slow-release pacifier has been developed containing a pouch in which a food supplement tablet can be inserted.
Both have similar shaped nipples (orthodontic), but the pacifier nipple is stiffer.
Although the devices are readily available, few studies have been performed on the use of pacifier thermometers, which use the supralingual site, to measure temperature in children (Banco, Jayashekaramurthy, & Graffam, 1988; Beckstrand et al.